Help Us Celebrate Adopt a Shelter Pet Day

12337829_lOn National Adopt a Shelter Pet Day (April 30, 2018), Hale Pet Door salutes the pet parents who have chosen to open their hearts and homes to pets in need through adoption.

With 6.5 million animals entering shelters every year across the US, overcrowding of shelters is one of the most pressing issues in animal welfare. Choosing to adopt a pet instead of buying one from a breeder or a pet store benefits both animals and people in a number of ways, including:

Saving Lives

When you adopt a shelter pet, you are not only saving the life of the pet you adopt, but you are making room for the pet that comes into the shelter after him. Your adoption fees also help support the shelter, which helps them save more pet lives.

Saving Money

It costs much less to adopt a pet through a shelter or a rescue when compared to purchasing, and your adopted pet will most likely be spayed or neutered, brought up to date on shots, dewormed, and treated for fleas and ticks before they come into your care, saving quite a lot of money on veterinary bills. Your shelter may also cover the cost of microchipping.

7917806_l

You’ll Get a Great Pet

Most shelter pets end up there through no fault of their own – because of a divorce, or because their owners moved, or otherwise couldn’t take care of them any more. These pets are screened for behavioral or temperament concerns prior to adoption, and are ready to integrate into the right home. And adult pets are already potty trained! It’s also worth noting that there is a rescue out there for almost any kind of pet you are looking for, including exotic ones.

Improving Your Health

Owning a pet has been shown to improve your well being in a number of ways, including benefits to cardiovascular health, increased exercise, reduced stress, decreased loneliness, anxiety and depression, and strengthening of compassion and overall improvement of mood. Pets can even help improve your social life!

These are just a few of the many, many reasons why it’s so great to adopt a pet, but here’s one more:

Rescue Rewards

Hale Pet Door is proud of the continuing success of our Pet Rescue Rewards Program. When our customers adopt a pet, they save 10% off of their purchase of a Hale Pet Door product, and we donate an additional 10% to their rescue or shelter. To date, we have made thousands of donations to rescues and shelters across the country.

This April 30th, and every day, we THANK YOU for adopting your pet, and for helping us to give back to pets in need.

Advertisements

National Kids & Pets Day

52399292_lIt’s National Kids and Pets Day! Send us a picture and/or short story of your kids and their pets.

What’s not to love about kids and their pets? The bond between a child and their pet is almost magical, bringing love, laughter and happiness to all who are around them.

But having a pet(s) brings so much more to our kids. Here are a few highlights of how they change us:

  • With their unconditional love our pets give support and help children develop self-esteem and confidence. And instills our kids to have compassion for animals and people throughout their life.
  • Pets – whether they have fur, fins, feathers or scales – teach responsibility. They need to be fed, their area cleaned, walked, played with and taught manners. They also need regular visits to the vet.
  • Children and families learn safe handling of pets. As well as how to keep both your child and pet safe in different situations.4539143 - a little dog licking a young boy's nose
  • They give your kid a playmate. Even if your child has siblings and friends a pet gives them another friend. One to learn new games with, like fetch and tug-of-war. And a friend to make them smile if they’ve had a bad day.
  • They also help kids understand the different stages of life. Life has lots of different happenings – birth, health, illness, growing older and death. With having a pet, your children will experience some or all of these different events, which are both happy and sad. Though no parent wants their child to experience illness or death, they will be better able to cope with life because of experiences with their pet.

Enjoy the smiles, laughter and heart tugs you feel as you watch your kids grow with their pets.

Ultimately our wish is that our pets help our children become kind, caring and compassionate adults – making the world a better place to live.

Heartworm Awareness Month

In April, pet organizations nationwide work to bring attention to the prevention of Heartworm Disease during National Heartworm Awareness Month.

41586342_l edited

What is Heartworm Disease?

Heartworm disease is a potentially fatal disease that affects dogs and cats, as well as other mammals, and it is spread by mosquitoes. When a mosquito bites an infected animal, it could carry microscopic baby worms to your healthy pet. Because mosquitoes can easily get inside your home, even exclusively indoor pets are at risk.

Dogs are a natural host for heartworms, and if not detected early, heartworms can multiply inside a dog’s heart, lungs and associated vessels until there are hundreds of worms, causing severe lung disease, heart failure and other organ damage. Symptoms of heartworm disease may not appear until the disease is advanced, and may include a persistent cough, lethargy, fatigue, decreased appetite, and weight loss.

Because cats are not natural hosts for heartworms, it is less likely that worms will reach adulthood in a cat, and if they do, they will not be as numerous as in a dog. However, even immature heartworms can cause serious health problems for cats, including respiratory disease. Signs of heartworm in cats may include coughing, loss of appetite, vomiting, or weight loss.

How is Heartworm treated?

Treatment for heartworm disease in dogs can be lengthy and expensive, which is why prevention is key. If your dog does become infected, treatment might include medications, surgery and serial blood tests.

Unfortunately, there is no approved drug therapy to treat heartworm in cats, but close veterinary care in these cases is still essential.

Prevention is the Best Treatment

Dogs and cats should be tested for heartworm at their regular veterinary visits, and your vet can prescribe monthly preventatives for you to administer to your pet. It is important to stay on top of preventative medications to avoid a gap that could leave your pet vulnerable to infection.

For more information on how to protect your pet from heartworm disease, please visit the Heartworm Society website.

Be sure to Thank your local Animal Care & Control Officers this week!

A12353062 - angry dog biting a african american dog catcherpril 8-14, 2018 is Animal Care and Control Appreciation Week, do something special for your ACOs this week. Send them balloons, flowers or a nice card, letting them know that you appreciate all they do for their and your community.

Do you know all that they do and are responsible for? Here are some highlights:

  • ACOs are public safety officers dealing with dangerous situations on a regular basis to protect your community.
  • ACOs help all kinds of animals (domestic and wild) in all kinds of situations – they may be lost, sick, injured, starved, misused or need transportation.
  • ACOs apprehend and impound loose dogs and/or livestock.
  • They assist citizens with the removal of nuisance wildlife (skunks, raccoons, and squirrels) by setting up and maintaining live traps.
  • ACOs also care for and adopt out homeless pets who need shelter and new families.
  • As one of your community’s animal welfare organizations, your city or county animal control collaborates with private non-profit animal groups to pull together all available resources for homeless pets.
  • Rabies is under control in the United States because of ACOs . They enforce the laws and statutes which protect people and animals from rabies and other life-threatening diseases.
  • ACOs will mediate neighborhood disputes over animal issues/concerns through communication, education, and enforcement
  • ACOs cooperate with other agencies/officers, such as Police Officers, Wildlife Officers and Sheriff’s Deputies when necessary.

To reiterate – in a given week (or even a single day), an ACO may rescue a kitten trapped in a wall, catch and relocate a possum or native snake, work with local police on a drug raid, help a lost dog find his people (and vice versa), retrieve a scared or confused horse or cow from morning traffic, adopt a homeless cat to her new family, and testify in court against an abusive pet owner. Whew!

So Thank You, Thank You, Thank You ACOs for all that you do!