Traveling with your Dog

Traveling with your dog can feel daunting, but sometimes, leaving Fido behind just isn’t an option. Luckily, if you do a little planning ahead of time, traveling with your dog can be a piece of cake.

Naturally, the first thing you want to consider before traveling with any pet is their health. Are they in good enough health to travel in the first place? If so, are they up to date with checkups and vaccinations? Most everywhere you travel with your dog will require that they are up to date with all of their shots. Take the time to pay your vet a visit and make sure they’re good to go. It’s also a good idea to have them groomed just before you leave and have their nails trimmed.

Make sure that your dog’s collar has an ID tag on it and that they are microchipped. It also doesn’t hurt to bring a copy of any paperwork that might come in handy if there was an emergency such as health records. Don’t forget to bring a leash!

Whether you are traveling by car or by plane, you may wish to take a crate. There are many reasons to pack the crate. If your dog is used to sleeping in his crate at night, taking his bed with you is a great way to help him feel more comfortable during your travels. But safety is another great reason to bring it with you. It’s a lot safer to not allow your dog to roam around in the car while you’re driving. Should you have to slam on your breaks or get into an accident, your dog could be seriously injured or could cause injury to other passengers in the car by being loose. Another option, if you’re not wanting to take a crate, is to purchase a special restraint that is made just for dogs that easily clips into your seats.

If you’re planning on taking an airplane to your destination, it’s important to do your research about taking your dog. Unfortunately, pets have been killed or injured on airplanes. This is much to do with the fact that they’re put in the cargo area of the plane and are subjected to extreme hot and cold temperatures, lack of ventilation, and rough handling by staff. Though the vast majority of the time, pets are unharmed during air travel, it is certainly not without risk, so please investigate before making this decision.

If you’re traveling by car, be sure to make frequent stops to let your dog use the bathroom and stretch his legs. But be careful not to ever leave your pooch alone in the car for long, especially if it’s hot out. What may feel like a warm day outside can quickly become a deadly temperature inside a car. So try to always stay with your dog. Get him out of the car as much as possible when you’re stopped, and bring plenty of fresh water so that he’ll stay nice and hydrated.

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Is Pet Insurance Worth It?

Many of us have experienced the financial burden and sometimes even hardships associated with the medical care of our pets – especially after they get sick or injured. Medical procedures and surgeries for your pet can easily cost thousands of dollars. So, it’s no surprise that the popularity of pet insurance has skyrocketed in recent years. With the promise of more affordable lifetime care for your pet, it’s pretty much irresistible. I mean, if humans need health insurance, then why not your pet? It’s just the responsible thing to do, right?

But is pet insurance actually worth it? Just like people health insurance, pet insurance premiums will likely fluctuate throughout your pet’s life. Starting off less expensive when they’re young and healthy, and then increase as your pet ages. Depending on the breed of your dog and the plan you’re signed up with, monthly premiums could start at under $50 a month, and by the time your dog is 12, the cost might jump to upwards of $150 a month. That’s a pretty significant increase. For a lot of people, the cost just doesn’t seem justified. Especially for those who are lucky enough to have pets who are overall in good health, the cost of the pet insurance will likely outweigh the actual medical costs. But then again, when something catastrophic does happen to your pet, it is typically unforeseen, and you may be very glad that you had signed up for health insurance. If you’re facing a ten thousand dollar back surgery for your dog, a thousand dollar yearly premium may not seem so bad after all.

For many of us, if you add up your typical yearly vet bills, it’s well under $100 dollars. And if your monthly pet insurance premium is $50 per month, that adds up to $600 per year. For many, insurance just doesn’t seem worth having just for the possibility of an unfortunate incident occurring. However, for someone who owns a breed of dog that tends to have a lot of health complications as they go throughout life, having an insurance policy may be a smart investment.

If you do choose to look into pet insurance, make sure you shop around and do your research. Get quotes from multiple companies and ask how the premiums will change as your pet ages. Also, get a detailed report on what exactly is covered under the plan and what is not. It would be a terrible waste to purchase a plan only to find out what you really needed covered is not. Also, if your pet is currently sick or being treated for an illness, the policy is likely not to cover any of that care, so double check. Likewise, if your pet does suffer from a preexisting condition, check to see whether or not it will be covered as many companies will reject these claims.

There’s no one-size-fits-all answer to the question of pet insurance, so make sure to weigh all your options and do all your homework to find out what’s best for your family.