Pick the Perfect Pet During Adopt a Shelter Dog Month

Adopt a Shelter Dog Month

October is Adopt a Shelter Dog Month! There are so many great reasons to adopt a dog from a shelter instead of from a breeder. We’ve compiled a list of just a few reasons why adopting is the way to go.

Skip the puppy stage.

There’s no doubt that puppies are cute as heck. They’re squishy, wiggly, fluffy, and pretty much adorable. But they are also a ton of work. There is a lot of work that comes along with owning a puppy, and in a lot of ways, it’s not unlike having a newborn! Most puppies need to be let outside numerous times a night as their bladder control is developing and they’re getting the hang of house training. Depending on the breed, teaching your dog to go potty outside, can be a grueling and frustrating time. Puppies can be very destructive to your home. Think ripped upholstery, chewed shoes, and torn carpet. Plus, lots of people who are adopting look for puppies. So chances are you can find the perfect dog for your family by looking at slightly older dogs who are already housebroken and have plenty of love to give that other people simply overlook due to not being “puppies”.

Much more affordable.

If you’ve done any research on the cost of buying a dog, it is probably a lot more than you’d think! Puppies, especially more rare or in-demand breeds can be quite costly. You’d be forking up hundreds if not thousands to get your hands on certain breeds. Yes, thousands. When in the end, all you are really wanting is a great dog or cat. And there are so many wonderful dogs available for adoption at your local shelter – and all you need to pay is the adoption fee.

Have we mentioned the great pets you’ll find?

Seriously, most dogs don’t end up in shelters because they’re “bad”, they end up there because of things like a move or divorce. There are so many really, really great, loving dogs that are just hoping for a family to love. By going to a shelter first, you’ll get the chance to meet and get to know dogs of all ages. There is just bound to be one (or two!) that is absolutely perfect for you and your family.

You’ll save a LIFE.

Just let that sink in. You’ll be actually saving a life. What’s more important than that? You’ll not only make a homeless dog incredibly happy by bringing him or her into your home, but you’ll also be saving their life. It’s really a win for everybody, so why not try?

Help Lucky Animals Find a New Home

shutterstock_148956599March is a month when lots of people think about “good luck” because of St. Patrick’s Day.  Millions of animals aren’t so “lucky” because they end up in pet rescues, animal shelters, and humane societies every day.  But fortunately, a larger percentage than ever before of those millions of animals are experiencing a change in their fortunes and being adopted by loving, forever homes.

Hale Pet Door has made pet rescue a priority mission during our almost 35 years in business and we continue to do so with your help through our Rescue Rewards Program.  Together we can make a difference in the lives of so many animals.

What We Have Done

Hale is proud to announce that we now have well over 2500 participating pet rescue organizations around the country and we have donated over $400,000 to these organizations to further assist their efforts in helping homeless animals everywhere.

How can you help?

  • Adopt don’t buy – Every pet bought at a pet store is one less adopted from a shelter and many pet store animals have come from puppy mills or disreputable breeders who do not provide humane conditions for their breeding animals.
  • Spay or Neuter your pets – Don’t add even more animals to the problem. Controlling the pet population at the source is a huge first step.
  • Volunteer  – Check with your local humane society or a pet rescue.  Animals need walked, fed, socialized, trained, kennels cleaned and more.
  • If you can’t adopt, FOSTER –  Maybe you can welcome animals into your home temporarily until they find their forever home.

To help your newly adopted or your current pet have the best of both worlds (inside and outside), consider a Hale Pet Door to give them and you more freedom in your lives.  And with Hale’s Rescue Rewards program, you not only help the pet you adopted you help other animals as well.  When you purchase a pet door for your adopted pet and tell us the name of the rescue or humane society where you adopted them, you get 10% off your purchase and we donate an additional 10% back to the rescue so they can continue helping even more animals.  A LUCKY day all around!

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Help Hale Pet Door Make a Difference This Giving Tuesday

giving tuesday 2018Giving Tuesday was started in 2012 and is a global day of giving. Celebrated the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, it kicks off the holiday season by giving back – to your community, to charities – by volunteering, gifting or donating money. Created to combat commercialism and powered by social media and your collaboration.

We take our charity work seriously and make donations every week to pet rescues around the country.  We have also participated in Giving Tuesday in the past and are happy to do so again this year.  With so many natural disasters around the country and around the world, we decided to focus our donations this year on helping those affected.

Therefore, this coming Giving Tuesday, November 27, 2018, we will be donating 10% of our net sales to the Humane Society of Ventura County and the North Valley Animal Disaster Group to assist them as they help those affected by the horrible wildfires burning in California right now.

You can help by making any purchase on our website that day knowing that 10% of your purchase is going to those in need.  In addition, if you have rescued your pet you will still get 10% off your purchase price and we will still donate another 10% to the rescue of your choice.

So please help us make a difference this #GivingTuesday.  You can check out our complete product line to see what works best for you and the four-legged friend in your life. #HaleGives #HalePetDoorGives #GivingTuesday2018

November is Adopt a Senior Pet Month

Why You Should Consider Adopting a Senior Pet

When people think about adopting a new pet for their family, kittens and puppies often come to mind, not seniors. Older dogs and cats often take the longest to be adopted and are more likely to face being euthanized than younger adoptable pets. But that’s not because they’re not a great choice for adoption – but perhaps simply because they lack the “newness” of a puppy or kitten.

People also sometimes feel unsure about adopting an older canine or feline because of their shorter lifespan, or the possibilities of them needing extra veterinary care that will add more expense. Sometimes people assume that older pets were put up for adoption because there was something wrong with them or they might have a bad temperament, but that simply isn’t true in most cases. Older dogs and cats are often put up for adoption due to changes in financial or home situations. This regularly happens when seniors have to move into a retirement home or pass away, and their beloved pets are left without an owner and must be placed in a shelter.

The truth is, older pets can make a delightful addition to any family! In fact, there are many benefits to adopting a senior dog or cat over a younger one:

What You See is What You Get

Older pets often have calmer dispositions and their personalities are already formed. You’ll know if you’re adopting a dog that loves to lay on the couch and snuggle, or if they’re more of the loner type. You’ll also know if they’re good with kids and other pets, or if they prefer to be a solo fur baby. You’ll be able to find the perfect family member to fit into your home and lifestyle situation.

You Get to Skip the “Puppy” Phase

If you’ve ever owned a puppy or a kitten, you know just how daunting it can be for the first few months or even the first couple of years. Senior dogs tend to be more relaxed and less energetic than puppies, and an older cat will often be more socialized and less temperamental than kittens. Another great bonus is that the pet will most likely already be house or litter trained. Older dogs can also still be taught new tricks and will most likely come along with some training already!

Help a Senior Pet Find Their Forever Home Today

Senior pets face a much harder journey to get adopted than younger one. In many shelters and rescues, the senior pets are the most difficult ones to get adopted and take the longest. Many unfortunately never find their forever home and end up living out their days at a shelter. But you can be that loving home they’ve been waiting for. Senior canines and felines are hoping for just one thing; loving companionship. So, when you’re ready to open your home and welcome a new family member, we urge you to consider adopting a senior pet. We think they will make a wonderful addition to your family, and you’ll make their whole life wonderful.

Which Bedding Products Can You Donate to an Animal Shelter?

Local shelters depend on donations to stay within their usually meager budgets. Before you pack up your trunk with items that you’re sure will help, take a look at our list of regular household bedding and other products that will make the biggest difference to your local shelter. A few of them you might not have even considered donating before.

1. Towels

Towels may not technically be bedding, but for an animal, they may be. These household cast-offs are like gold for shelters because they can be used in so many ways. Small dogs and cats used them as bedding and volunteers cut or rip them into pieces to be used as rags to clean animals, cages, and the occasional accident.

2. Blankets

It doesn’t matter what kind of bed your blankets fit on, they’ll find new use at a shelter. Blankets, like towels, make wonderful bedding except they can be used for animals of all sizes. Fleece blankets are highly coveted for their soft, comfortable texture and ability to keep body temperatures up. For a shelter animal, a blanket of their own can make what space they have feel like a home.

3. Gently Used Pet Bedding

If your own pet’s bed is ready for an upgrade, his gently used bedding will work for a rescue animal. Animals of all sizes end up in shelters so the size of the bedding doesn’t matter. It just needs to be intact enough that the filling isn’t coming out, creating a potential choking hazard.

4. Heating Pads

Once you’re ready to replace your old heating pad, it can find new life at a shelter. Newborns and babies of all species can’t regulate their body temperatures as well as adults. Young animals may come to the shelter after their mothers have been killed or separated from them so they’re going to need the extra warmth their mother used to provide.

5. Non-Bedding Donations

Of course, shelters need far more than bedding. We’ve put together a few other suggestions for items you may have lying around the house:

  • Extra/Used Pet Accessories:
    Leashes, collars, sweaters, and coats can all be put to use. Like bedding, make sure there aren’t any tears that could make them dangerous for another animal.
  • Pet Food: OK, you’re not going to have unwanted pet food around, but why not buy one extra bag every few months and give it to the shelter? It will help them stay within their budget, and make you feel good knowing you’re helping hungry animals.
  • Newspaper: Once those old newspapers start piling up, drop them off at a shelter where they’ll be used to line crates and cages. Newspapers quickly get used up so shelters are always in need.
  • Office Supplies: This is another one you may not have thought of but volunteers have to print and fill out a lot of forms. Any extra office supplies can help keep the shelter within budget. The more money they save the more animals they can help.

Donations get used items out of your house and into the hands (or paws) of those who need them. While you can’t bring home every animal in the shelter, you can certainly help them on their journey to their forever home.

Guest Blog post by SleepHelp.org

Get Outside for National Walk Your Dog Week

47410078_l.jpgThe weather is starting to cool down, and this makes the first week in October the perfect time to celebrate National Walk Your Dog Week.

Obesity is on the rise in the US, both for humans and for their canine friends. In the US, an estimated 56% of dogs are overweight – that amounts to about 50 million dogs! Excess weight in dogs can create health problems such as diabetes, heart disease, pancreatitis and cancer. A sedentary lifestyle, which is a large contributing factor to obesity, can also cause behavior problems in dogs, due to boredom or excess energy that has not been burned off in a positive way. Sadly, these behavior problems can sometimes land dogs in overcrowded shelters. What can we do?

In addition to keeping a close eye on a dog’s diet, avoiding unhealthy foods and making sure not to overfeed, one great way to address a dog’s weight problem is to walk with them every day. A daily 30 minute walk will help both you and your dog meet national standards for heart health, and will get you both on the road to a healthier weight. The exercise also has the added benefit of tiring your dog out – remember, a tired dog is a good dog.

You may be thinking to yourself that you have a large yard, and a pet door for your dogs – isn’t this enough? While it is true that it is very beneficial for a dog to have free access to their yard, and it helps provide an excellent foundation for a healthy dog, there is more to the picture. When a dog is outside in their own yard, there is a lot of (valuable) time spent exploring his territory, sniffing around, lying in the sun – all very important activities for your dog. But this outside time doesn’t quite live up to the sustained exercise a dog needs – similar to how the time we spend outdoors in our garden, while great for us, doesn’t quite provide all of the cardiovascular exercise our own bodies need. Also, when you take your dog out into the world for a walk, there are new sights, sounds and smells that stimulate his brain in a different way than his usual scene, which gives him a mental health boost in addition to a heart health one.

You can even get your whole family involved. If you bring your kids along on your walks, you will be not only modeling an active lifestyle for them, but you will also be teaching them how to take excellent care of their own dogs when they get older.

These are all great points, but what if you don’t have a dog to walk? There is a great solution to that problem waiting for you at your local dog shelter. Remember how we mentioned above that some dogs end up in shelters due to behavior problems that have their root in a sedentary lifestyle and obesity? You can find yourself the perfect walking buddy in a dog who needs you to help him get to be his healthiest and happiest self. It’s a win-win!

Consider Adopting a Less Adoptable Pet

According to the ASPCA, 6.5 million companion animals enter shelters in the US every year. Shelter and rescue resources are stretched thin as they try to find homes for these pets, and sadly, only 50%, on average, will be adopted – and we know the sad end to the story for many of the other 50%.

In 2009, Petfinder.com, an online searchable database that partners with shelters and rescues to help connect homeless pets with adopters, founded “Adopt a Less Adoptable Pet Week” (the third week in September) to highlight the struggle of finding homes for pets who, statistically, have a harder time finding a home. In a recent survey, Petfinder revealed that 95% of responding rescues have pets that they define as being “hard to adopt.” While an average pet spends about 12 weeks on the site before adoption, pets that have special needs, black coats or senior pets may take four times that long to find a home.

While pets with health problems and disabilities, such as cats with FIV, or dogs with diabetes, can live relatively normal lives with average lifespans, the fact that they require a little extra care, and perhaps medication, makes a pet with special needs less likely to be adopted. Even disabilities as simple as a missing eye or leg, that requires no extra care, can cause a pet to be passed over. This tragic fact is made even more so when you consider how rewarding it can be to bring a pet like this into your family, and how manageable many disabilities and illnesses can become with a little education and support from a great veterinarian.

It may seem like an old wives’ tale, but many shelters and rescues still report that animals with a black coat are less likely to be adopted than pets of any other color. There are varying views on why this is true, from the lingering stigma of black cats (and even dogs) of old being associated with witchcraft and bad luck, to the belief that they are harder to photograph. Some sources state that it’s simply the fact that there are more black cats and dogs than other colors, and so people will pass them by in favor of a less common color. Whatever the reason, we hope our readers realize what great pets black cats and dogs make (I mean, black cats look like tiny panthers – what could be better?).

And when it comes to senior pets, this may be the saddest less-adoptable category of them all. Many times, senior pets have been given up because their older owners have died or had to move into assisted living, or their owners may have decided that they couldn’t deal with senior-related changes or expenses. These kinds of surrenders are so sad, because senior pets have likely been with their owners for many years, and don’t understand why they have been left in this situation. And, just as a side effect of not being a cute and cuddly little puppy or kitten any longer, these older pets may never find a new home. How sad, considering that senior pets can be the perfect pets – mellow, low demands for energy, they just need a loving place to lay their heads, and kind pat on the head, and a good meal.

When you next find yourself in the position of opening your home to a new pet, we hope that you keep these “less-adoptable” pets in mind. You could even consider covering all of the bases, and adopt a senior, special needs pet who happens to have a black coat – you could save a life and make a new best friend.

Celebrate National Craft for Your Local Shelter on July 21st

Local shelters and humane societies are always in need of financial or volunteer assistance and supplies. Crafters are always keeping busy with their favorite type of hobby. In 2012, Sew Doggy Style created National Craft for your Local Shelters Day on July 21st to combine the best of both worlds.

It is designed to be fun and affordable, simple and meaningful. No matter what type of crafting hobby you enjoy: sewing, knitting, crocheting, woodworking, etc. or even if you have no formal “crafting” skill, anyone can make something to donate to your local shelter.

Hale Pet Door is headquartered in Canon City, Colorado, and we interviewed Ann Goldman, owner of Yarned and Dangerous (our local knitting, crocheting, weaving, spinning, and fiber arts store) and Doug Rae, Executive Director of the Fremont County Humane Society to see one example of this special day in action.

Ann Goldman tells us: “What to do when you knit, love animals, and have spare time? You knit cat mats!

Here at our Local Yarn Shop, we get lots of donated yarn. We have many who love to knit but don’t need another hat, scarf, or afghan. So we pair those avid knitters with the donated yarn and the results? 100s of cat mats. We love knitting for our kitties housed at the Humane Society of Fremont County. We’ve been told they love our cat mats. These many cat mats have been turned into hammocks, nests, cocoons, or just nice blankies. It is our joy and pleasure. I found 2 pictures that show off the cats with the mats.

The little one with attitude is Felix. The older cat chilling is Aerosmith. They are available for adoption now. Of course, their mats go home with them.”

Executive Director Doug Rae adds: “The Humane Society of Fremont County relies on private donations on many levels. One such level is when local residents take it upon themselves to do something for the shelter animals. Ann and her gang from Yarned and Dangerous in Canon City regularly knit blankets for the shelter cats. Every cat in the shelter has one of those blankets in their kennel, and when the pet is adopted, the blanket goes home with the new adopter and the cat. One walk through cat adoptions and you’ll see how much the cats love these donated blankets.”

“Dick Ward has been making handmade animal puzzles out of wood for quite some time. A few years back, Dick and his wife Korla came to me with their offer to make puzzles for the shelter so we could sell them and turn the puzzles into cash for the animals. Dick’s puzzles are for sale for $10.00 each in our retail section.”

“Moreover, Dick has a similar set-up with Cup & Cone here in town. Dick provides Cup & Cone with his puzzles and almost every month, the shelter receives a check in the mail from the sales of Dick’s puzzles at Cup & Cone! I have offered to pay for the wood Dick uses for his puzzles, but he politely declines and will not take one penny from the shelter.”

“Deanna Jacobs donates her hand-made jewelry to the shelter. Deanna made this jewelry for a special event the shelter held. After every item sold at that event, Deanna gave the shelter enough of her to jewelry to fill up a large jewelry display in the lobby. All of Deanna’s items, whether it be bracelets or earrings, has something to do with the animals. Like everyone else, Deanna won’t take a penny from the shelter for her donated jewelry.”

What a wonderful testament to the giving spirit of these talented people.

If formal hobbies aren’t your style, you can make simple cat toys out of toilet paper tubes and kleenex boxes; you can make dog toys out of ropes or plastic water bottles; you can make beds and blankets out of old t-shirts and pillows. The ideas are endless.

For some more ideas and instructions on how you can participate in this holiday check out some of the following articles:

Your Craft Skills Can Help Shelter Cats

http://www.sewdoggystyle.com/p/craft-for-shelters.html

https://www.petguide.com/petcare/dog/6-easy-crafts-can-make-help-local-animal-shelter/

https://iheartdogs.com/10-ways-to-craft-for-your-local-shelter-on-july-21st/

https://www.vet-organics.com/blogs/news/national-craft-for-your-local-shelters-day

https://www.sitstay.com/blogs/good-dog-blog/help-your-local-shelter-with-these-fun-craft-projects

Be Prepared to Care for Your Pets in a Disaster – National Animal Disaster Preparedness Day is May 12

85018767_l cropPrior to 2005, not much official consideration had been given to the needs of pets in a disaster situation. But when more than 150,000 pets perished in Hurricane Katrina, largely as a result of there being no provisions for the rescue of animals, this critical concern was brought to national awareness. In addition to legal measures being passed to protect the rights of animals to be rescued by officials in disasters, National Animal Disaster Preparedness Day was established to help educate the public on the needs of animals in these situations.

Your pets are a part of your family, and just like any other family member, planning and preparation for unexpected situations is important. Here are some ways you can prepare to care for your pet in a disaster:

Be Aware

  • While you can’t predict every potential problem, it is important to know what the most likely dangers are for your geographic area, such as earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, flooding, etc.
  • Know what the local disaster evacuation plans and routes are for your area.

Find Safe Havens

  • Never leave your pet behind if you have to evacuate, as they will be unable to fend for themselves in a disaster situation. However,
  • It is important to have a Rescue Alert Sticker on your windows to alert rescuers to the presence of your pets, in the event that you were separated at the time of evacuation. If you evacuate with your pets, and there is time, write “Evacuated” on the stickers to let rescuers know that you are all out.
  • Some evacuation shelters do not accept pets, so it is very important to research where your pet could board in a disaster.
  • Know which hotels in the area would accept you and your pets together in a disaster.
  • Designate a trusted friend, neighbor or family member that can come into your home and help your pets if you are away in a disaster.

Pack an Emergency Kit

  • Make or purchase a first aid kit for your pet. If you make your own, ask your vet for advice on what to include for your pet to meet their individual needs.
  • Keep a 7 day supply of food (both canned and dry) and water for your pet in waterproof and airtight containers that are easy to transport. Rotate these every two months.
  • Make sure your pet’s tags are up to date and secure to their collar, and consider microchipping. It is also a good idea to include a recent photo of you with your pet for visual identification in case of separation.
  • Include a copy of recent health and immunization records in a sealed plastic bag.
  • Pack an extra leash and collar, along with their carrier. Dogs will need crate liners, and cats will need a disposable litter tray and a supply of cat litter.
  • Pack a few comfort items – blankets, a couple of toys.

Add to this list anything that is individual for your own situation, as you best know your own pets and their personal needs. For more information on how to keep your furry family members safe in a disaster, please see these helpful articles on the ASPCA and the Red Cross websites.

 

 

 

Help Us Celebrate Adopt a Shelter Pet Day

12337829_lOn National Adopt a Shelter Pet Day (April 30, 2018), Hale Pet Door salutes the pet parents who have chosen to open their hearts and homes to pets in need through adoption.

With 6.5 million animals entering shelters every year across the US, overcrowding of shelters is one of the most pressing issues in animal welfare. Choosing to adopt a pet instead of buying one from a breeder or a pet store benefits both animals and people in a number of ways, including:

Saving Lives

When you adopt a shelter pet, you are not only saving the life of the pet you adopt, but you are making room for the pet that comes into the shelter after him. Your adoption fees also help support the shelter, which helps them save more pet lives.

Saving Money

It costs much less to adopt a pet through a shelter or a rescue when compared to purchasing, and your adopted pet will most likely be spayed or neutered, brought up to date on shots, dewormed, and treated for fleas and ticks before they come into your care, saving quite a lot of money on veterinary bills. Your shelter may also cover the cost of microchipping.

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You’ll Get a Great Pet

Most shelter pets end up there through no fault of their own – because of a divorce, or because their owners moved, or otherwise couldn’t take care of them any more. These pets are screened for behavioral or temperament concerns prior to adoption, and are ready to integrate into the right home. And adult pets are already potty trained! It’s also worth noting that there is a rescue out there for almost any kind of pet you are looking for, including exotic ones.

Improving Your Health

Owning a pet has been shown to improve your well being in a number of ways, including benefits to cardiovascular health, increased exercise, reduced stress, decreased loneliness, anxiety and depression, and strengthening of compassion and overall improvement of mood. Pets can even help improve your social life!

These are just a few of the many, many reasons why it’s so great to adopt a pet, but here’s one more:

Rescue Rewards

Hale Pet Door is proud of the continuing success of our Pet Rescue Rewards Program. When our customers adopt a pet, they save 10% off of their purchase of a Hale Pet Door product, and we donate an additional 10% to their rescue or shelter. To date, we have made thousands of donations to rescues and shelters across the country.

This April 30th, and every day, we THANK YOU for adopting your pet, and for helping us to give back to pets in need.