The Best Dog Breeds for Families

Thinking of adding a new best friend to your family. As always we say “Adopt Don’t Shop” but how do you find a dog that will best fit your lifestyle and family.  Here’s a list of some dog breeds that may be the perfect choice.

Beagle

These high-energy dogs make a wonderful addition to any family, but keep in mind they do require a lot of playtime and attention. Beagles are loving and curious and love to be in the company of their family. Typically weighing under 20 pounds and standing at around 13 inches, they’ve been referred to being big for their inches. They’re a great dog for families with kids who would enjoy having a playful and friendly companion.

Boxer

Boxers are another energetic breed that loves playing with his family members. Lovable and social, the Boxer takes his job as guardian and watchdog very seriously and is very protective of his family. Puppies can be quite wild an ornery, but are also quick learners and are eager to please. A larger breed, males can stand as much as 25 inches tall.

Golden Retriever

One of the classic breeds that come to mind when people think of family dogs, the Gold Retriever is loyal, lovable, and patient. A good breed for families with kids, Golden Retrievers are not aggressive and enjoy spending time with everyone in the home. Golden Retrievers usually weigh between 50-70 pounds. This breed does require a lot of playtime and exercise, especially during puppyhood. With its longer coat, this breed does require more grooming and regular brushings. The Golden Retriever will love playing fetch for hours and will reward you by being extremely obedient and loving. This breed is a solid choice for any family.

Poodle

Poodles may not be a breed that comes to mind when you think of a family dog, but they are actually an excellent choice. Poodles are extremely intelligent and surprisingly gentle. Playful and adventurous, they are very loyal and patient with their family members but tend to be shy and standoffish with strangers. Easy to train, even if a little stubborn at times, they’re great for families with kids. But don’t forget that their coats do need to be regularly groomed. Poodles come in a variety of sizes, ranging from the Toy Poodle, which stands about 10 inches tall, to the Standard Poodle, which is around 20-24 inches tall.

Boston Terriers

Playful and energetic, Bostons are a wonderful choice for a family dog. Fiercely protective of his loved ones, the Boston Terrier will diligently guard and watch over his family. Boston Terrier’s adore playing with his family and will keep the kids busy with playtime. Full of antics and goofiness, the Boston Terrier will keep you forever entertained and will capture your heart. Boston Terriers are quick learners and tend to be fairly easy to housetrain. Compact but full of personality, Boston Terriers typically weigh in around 15 pounds.

Basset Hound

This stubby-legged hound is friendly and easygoing, making it a great choice for families. Known for their good sense of smell and sturdy body, Bassets typically weigh around 40-60 lbs. but are only about 14 inches tall at the withers. Some of the most distinctive features of this breed are their long, floppy ears, short stature, short little bowed legs, and of course their droopy, sad face. While they can sometimes be a challenge to train, as they tend to be a stubborn breed, they are smart and loyal and will make an excellent addition to the family.

Collie

Gentle and eager to please are just a couple ways to describe this breed. Collies typically mind their manners and are easier to train than some other breeds, this breed is perfect for not only families, but owners who may not have much experience with dogs. They are gentle and patient, which make them the perfect fit for families with children. Since they are a rather intelligent breed, they do need constant work with obedience training to stay engaged. But do keep in mind that their long fur does require regular grooming. Collies usually weigh between 45-65 pounds and come in a variety of colors.

Labrador Retriever

Another classic family dog and one of the most beloved breeds, the Labrador Retriever makes a wonderful addition to the household. Playful, loving, and protective, this dog will want to be by your family’s side for all time. Coming in chocolate, black, or yellow, their coat takes less work to maintain than the Golden Retriever variety, a periodic weekly brushing is all you need! Weighing in around 50-70 lbs, they are a good choice if you’d like a bit larger dog. Don’t be afraid to take this canine places – they especially love to go swimming! They need plenty of exercise, so don’t choose this breed if you don’t have time to devote to playtime.

 

Help Lucky Animals Find a New Home

shutterstock_148956599March is a month when lots of people think about “good luck” because of St. Patrick’s Day.  Millions of animals aren’t so “lucky” because they end up in pet rescues, animal shelters, and humane societies every day.  But fortunately, a larger percentage than ever before of those millions of animals are experiencing a change in their fortunes and being adopted by loving, forever homes.

Hale Pet Door has made pet rescue a priority mission during our almost 35 years in business and we continue to do so with your help through our Rescue Rewards Program.  Together we can make a difference in the lives of so many animals.

What We Have Done

Hale is proud to announce that we now have well over 2500 participating pet rescue organizations around the country and we have donated over $400,000 to these organizations to further assist their efforts in helping homeless animals everywhere.

How can you help?

  • Adopt don’t buy – Every pet bought at a pet store is one less adopted from a shelter and many pet store animals have come from puppy mills or disreputable breeders who do not provide humane conditions for their breeding animals.
  • Spay or Neuter your pets – Don’t add even more animals to the problem. Controlling the pet population at the source is a huge first step.
  • Volunteer  – Check with your local humane society or a pet rescue.  Animals need walked, fed, socialized, trained, kennels cleaned and more.
  • If you can’t adopt, FOSTER –  Maybe you can welcome animals into your home temporarily until they find their forever home.

To help your newly adopted or your current pet have the best of both worlds (inside and outside), consider a Hale Pet Door to give them and you more freedom in your lives.  And with Hale’s Rescue Rewards program, you not only help the pet you adopted you help other animals as well.  When you purchase a pet door for your adopted pet and tell us the name of the rescue or humane society where you adopted them, you get 10% off your purchase and we donate an additional 10% back to the rescue so they can continue helping even more animals.  A LUCKY day all around!

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Consider Adopting a Less Adoptable Pet

According to the ASPCA, 6.5 million companion animals enter shelters in the US every year. Shelter and rescue resources are stretched thin as they try to find homes for these pets, and sadly, only 50%, on average, will be adopted – and we know the sad end to the story for many of the other 50%.

In 2009, Petfinder.com, an online searchable database that partners with shelters and rescues to help connect homeless pets with adopters, founded “Adopt a Less Adoptable Pet Week” (the third week in September) to highlight the struggle of finding homes for pets who, statistically, have a harder time finding a home. In a recent survey, Petfinder revealed that 95% of responding rescues have pets that they define as being “hard to adopt.” While an average pet spends about 12 weeks on the site before adoption, pets that have special needs, black coats or senior pets may take four times that long to find a home.

While pets with health problems and disabilities, such as cats with FIV, or dogs with diabetes, can live relatively normal lives with average lifespans, the fact that they require a little extra care, and perhaps medication, makes a pet with special needs less likely to be adopted. Even disabilities as simple as a missing eye or leg, that requires no extra care, can cause a pet to be passed over. This tragic fact is made even more so when you consider how rewarding it can be to bring a pet like this into your family, and how manageable many disabilities and illnesses can become with a little education and support from a great veterinarian.

It may seem like an old wives’ tale, but many shelters and rescues still report that animals with a black coat are less likely to be adopted than pets of any other color. There are varying views on why this is true, from the lingering stigma of black cats (and even dogs) of old being associated with witchcraft and bad luck, to the belief that they are harder to photograph. Some sources state that it’s simply the fact that there are more black cats and dogs than other colors, and so people will pass them by in favor of a less common color. Whatever the reason, we hope our readers realize what great pets black cats and dogs make (I mean, black cats look like tiny panthers – what could be better?).

And when it comes to senior pets, this may be the saddest less-adoptable category of them all. Many times, senior pets have been given up because their older owners have died or had to move into assisted living, or their owners may have decided that they couldn’t deal with senior-related changes or expenses. These kinds of surrenders are so sad, because senior pets have likely been with their owners for many years, and don’t understand why they have been left in this situation. And, just as a side effect of not being a cute and cuddly little puppy or kitten any longer, these older pets may never find a new home. How sad, considering that senior pets can be the perfect pets – mellow, low demands for energy, they just need a loving place to lay their heads, and kind pat on the head, and a good meal.

When you next find yourself in the position of opening your home to a new pet, we hope that you keep these “less-adoptable” pets in mind. You could even consider covering all of the bases, and adopt a senior, special needs pet who happens to have a black coat – you could save a life and make a new best friend.

Help Us Celebrate Adopt a Shelter Pet Day

12337829_lOn National Adopt a Shelter Pet Day (April 30, 2018), Hale Pet Door salutes the pet parents who have chosen to open their hearts and homes to pets in need through adoption.

With 6.5 million animals entering shelters every year across the US, overcrowding of shelters is one of the most pressing issues in animal welfare. Choosing to adopt a pet instead of buying one from a breeder or a pet store benefits both animals and people in a number of ways, including:

Saving Lives

When you adopt a shelter pet, you are not only saving the life of the pet you adopt, but you are making room for the pet that comes into the shelter after him. Your adoption fees also help support the shelter, which helps them save more pet lives.

Saving Money

It costs much less to adopt a pet through a shelter or a rescue when compared to purchasing, and your adopted pet will most likely be spayed or neutered, brought up to date on shots, dewormed, and treated for fleas and ticks before they come into your care, saving quite a lot of money on veterinary bills. Your shelter may also cover the cost of microchipping.

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You’ll Get a Great Pet

Most shelter pets end up there through no fault of their own – because of a divorce, or because their owners moved, or otherwise couldn’t take care of them any more. These pets are screened for behavioral or temperament concerns prior to adoption, and are ready to integrate into the right home. And adult pets are already potty trained! It’s also worth noting that there is a rescue out there for almost any kind of pet you are looking for, including exotic ones.

Improving Your Health

Owning a pet has been shown to improve your well being in a number of ways, including benefits to cardiovascular health, increased exercise, reduced stress, decreased loneliness, anxiety and depression, and strengthening of compassion and overall improvement of mood. Pets can even help improve your social life!

These are just a few of the many, many reasons why it’s so great to adopt a pet, but here’s one more:

Rescue Rewards

Hale Pet Door is proud of the continuing success of our Pet Rescue Rewards Program. When our customers adopt a pet, they save 10% off of their purchase of a Hale Pet Door product, and we donate an additional 10% to their rescue or shelter. To date, we have made thousands of donations to rescues and shelters across the country.

This April 30th, and every day, we THANK YOU for adopting your pet, and for helping us to give back to pets in need.

Lucky Animals Get Adopted

March is traditionally a month when people think about being “lucky”. We thought it would be a perfect time to reflect on the thousands of “lucky” pets who are adopted into loving homes every day around the country. And especially we wanted to emphasize the benefits of adopting over buying.

According to the ASPCA website in March 2017, there have been “dramatic decreases in shelter intake and euthanasia of homeless dogs and cats. The ASPCA reports that an estimated 1.5 million companion animals are euthanized in U.S. animal shelters nationwide every year, a decrease from about 2.6 million estimated in 2011. Contributing to this reduction is an 18.5 percent increase in national adoptions. An estimated 3.2 million shelter animals are adopted each year (1.6 million dogs and 1.6 million cats), up from 2.7 million adoptions in 2011.” This is wonderful progress but still a sad ending for the 1.5 million sweet and loving animals who continue to be euthanized every year.

How can you help?

  • Adopt don’t buy – Every pet bought at a pet store is one less adopted from a shelter and many pet store animals have come from puppy mills or disreputable breeders who do not provide humane conditions for their breeding animals.
  • Spay or Neuter your pets – Don’t add even more animals to the problem. Controlling the pet population at the source is a huge first step.
  • Volunteer – Check with your local humane society or a pet rescue. Animals need walked, fed, socialized, trained, kennels cleaned and more.
  • If you can’t adopt, FOSTER – Maybe you can welcome animals into your home temporarily until they find their forever home.

There are thousands of wonderful “lucky” stories of pets, rescued from bad situations or lengthy stays at shelters/rescues to loving homes. Dogs that have transformed themselves bringing joy and happiness to their new owners – some even becoming service animals for their new owners.

Here are just a few stories from around the internet that show the best of side of humans and our furry counterparts.

11 Tear-Jerking Stories of Rescue Dogs That Found the Homes They Deserve

Journey Into Rescue – The Story of a Lucky Puppy

10 Large Cat Breeds: The Next Best Thing to Owning a Tiger

Miracle Dogs: Rescue Stories

13 Before and After Adoption Stories of Dogs Will Make Your Heart Kablooey With Happy

5 Dog Adoption Stories That’ll Restore Your Faith in Humanity

5 of the Sweetest Pet Adoption Stories of 2016

To help your new/current dog have the best of both worlds (inside and outside) consider a Hale Pet Door to give them and you more freedom in your lives. And with Hale’s Rescue Rewards program, you not only help the pet you adopted you help other animals as well. When you purchase a pet door for your adopted pet and tell us the name of the rescue or humane society where you adopted them, you get 10% off your purchase and we donate an additional 10% back to the rescue so they can continue helping even more animals. A LUCKY day all around!