Holiday Pet Safety Tips

Golden Retriever with Christmas Tree

Enjoy the holidays with your pets by keeping them safe

The holiday season is officially here! It’s time to celebrate with family and friends with decorations, gifts and luscious foods. It’s tempting to give in to the soulful looks of your furry friends when you’re enjoying exotic foods, it’s important to know that some of your favorite foods and decorations can be toxic or dangerous to your pets.

Foods that Can be Toxic to Your Pet

  •  Alcohol in beer, wine, mixed drinks
  • Caffeine in coffee, tea, soft drinks, cold medications and pain killers
  • Chocolate in candies, cakes and cocoa
  • Yeast Dough before baking
  • Raw Eggs
  • Fat Trimmings and Bones
  • Grapes, Raisins and Currants
  • Macadamia Nuts
  • Milk and Dairy Foods
  • Onions and Garlic
  • Persimmon, Peach and Plum pits contain cyanide
  • Raw Meat and Fish
  • Salty Foods
  • Sugary Drinks and Desserts
  • Xylitol sweetened candy, toothpaste, gum, baked goods and diet foods

Be Careful with Your Holiday Decorations

The following holiday decorations have been known to be hazardous to pets:

  • Pointsettias, Lilies, Mistletoe and Holly Berries
  • Tinsel and Garland if ingested
  • Candles can cause burns or become a fire hazard
  • Electrical Cords if chewed
  • Flocking or Imitation Snow
  • Preservatives in Live Christmas Tree Water
  • Snow Globes and Bubble Lights can contain toxic chemicals
  • Edible Ornaments can have toxic components
  • Potpourri can contain Essential Oils that can be toxic to cats: Cinnamon Bark Oil, Lavender Oil, Lemon Oil,  Melaleuca/Tea Tree Oil, Peppermint Oil, Thyme Oil or Wintergreen Oil

Plan Your Festivities to Avoid Your Pets’ Anxiety

You love sharing your home with family and friends, but make sure to consider your pets when entertaining – what’s fun for you may be stressful for your furry family members.

While your Labrador can be comfortable in the midst of the party, your cat may not be as social. Know your pet, if you think your cat or shy dog might be freaked out by so many strangers in the house, give them safe haven in a closed bedroom, their crate, or bed in a quiet corner.

Be sure to caution your guests about approaching your pets while they are in their “safe spots”. When your pets feel that they’re safe, they’ll come out of hiding to mingle, but don’t be surprised if they don’t appreciate your party.

Get a Hale Pet Door and Take the Stress Out of the Holidays

 Your pets’ safe haven may be their fenced backyard. When you have an energy efficient Hale Pet Door, your pets can come and go to the party as they please.

If you’re going to be away for the holidays, your pet sitter will appreciate the convenience your dog door brings to her schedule and your dog’s well being because he won’t have to wait for someone to come and let him out.

When you’re out visiting friends and relatives, the time can fly by – but with a durable Hale Pet Door, you won’t have to worry about getting home to let your dog out because she’ll be able to go out when she needs to.

There are dog doors for every location in your home. Check them out at Hale Pet Door and order yours today!

Winter Pet Safety: Top 7 Tips

Most dogs enjoy the snow, but be sure to keep them safe

Most dogs enjoy the snow, but be sure to keep them safe

1)   Get an energy efficient Hale Pet Door

When it’s cold and snowy outside, you may be tempted to leave your dog indoors where you know he’ll be safe from the tempestuous winter weather when you’re away from home. But it’s important that your dog has access to the outdoors to answer nature’s call when necessary. Having to ‘hold it’ can cause urinary tract and digestive issues that can result in much discomfort for your dog and extensive veterinarian bills for you.

2)   Don’t leave your pet in a parked car

Your parked car can be a freezer – trapping the cold air inside. It can be just as dangerous to leave your pet in your unattended car in the winter as in the hot months.

3)   Give your pet a warm bed

Just as you like a warm comfortable place to sleep, so does your cat or dog. Provide a bed – off the floor if possible – in an area away from drafts. A blanket can help trap your pet’s body heat, so she gets a good night’s sleep for optimal health and wellness.

4)   Keep common poisons out of pets’ reach

All medications, antifreeze (just a few licks can cause death), rodent baits and poisons, and some houseplants can make your pets sick. Use only pet-friendly ice melting products that won’t irritate your pets when they lick their paws and stomachs. Remember that some of the foods that you love so much — like chocolate — can be deadly to your pet.

5)   Prevent hypothermia and frostbite

Let your dog’s coat grow longer for the winter months. If your dog has a short coat, get him a coat or sweater that covers him from the base of his head to his tail and around his belly. If your pet gets too cold and shows signs of hypothermia: disoriented, shivering, lethargic or hair standing on end, get her to the vet immediately. Frostbite can affect the tips of the ears, extremities and reproductive organs turning the skin bright red, pale or black.

6)   Avoid electrocution and fire hazards

Chewing on heating pads wires can cause electrocution or shock. Heating pads’ iron oxide pads can cause poisoning. Portable heaters can be both a shock and fire hazard, so don’t leave your pet unattended with one in the room.

7)   Bang on the hood

Feral cats and wildlife seek the warmth of vehicle engines. Give them a chance to escape by knocking on the hood before starting your car or truck.

Enjoy the snow, but be sure to keep yourself and your best friends safe this winter season.