Help Lucky Animals Find a New Home

shutterstock_148956599March is a month when lots of people think about “good luck” because of St. Patrick’s Day.  Millions of animals aren’t so “lucky” because they end up in pet rescues, animal shelters, and humane societies every day.  But fortunately, a larger percentage than ever before of those millions of animals are experiencing a change in their fortunes and being adopted by loving, forever homes.

Hale Pet Door has made pet rescue a priority mission during our almost 35 years in business and we continue to do so with your help through our Rescue Rewards Program.  Together we can make a difference in the lives of so many animals.

What We Have Done

Hale is proud to announce that we now have well over 2500 participating pet rescue organizations around the country and we have donated over $400,000 to these organizations to further assist their efforts in helping homeless animals everywhere.

How can you help?

  • Adopt don’t buy – Every pet bought at a pet store is one less adopted from a shelter and many pet store animals have come from puppy mills or disreputable breeders who do not provide humane conditions for their breeding animals.
  • Spay or Neuter your pets – Don’t add even more animals to the problem. Controlling the pet population at the source is a huge first step.
  • Volunteer  – Check with your local humane society or a pet rescue.  Animals need walked, fed, socialized, trained, kennels cleaned and more.
  • If you can’t adopt, FOSTER –  Maybe you can welcome animals into your home temporarily until they find their forever home.

To help your newly adopted or your current pet have the best of both worlds (inside and outside), consider a Hale Pet Door to give them and you more freedom in your lives.  And with Hale’s Rescue Rewards program, you not only help the pet you adopted you help other animals as well.  When you purchase a pet door for your adopted pet and tell us the name of the rescue or humane society where you adopted them, you get 10% off your purchase and we donate an additional 10% back to the rescue so they can continue helping even more animals.  A LUCKY day all around!

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Help Hale Pet Door Make a Difference This Giving Tuesday

giving tuesday 2018Giving Tuesday was started in 2012 and is a global day of giving. Celebrated the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, it kicks off the holiday season by giving back – to your community, to charities – by volunteering, gifting or donating money. Created to combat commercialism and powered by social media and your collaboration.

We take our charity work seriously and make donations every week to pet rescues around the country.  We have also participated in Giving Tuesday in the past and are happy to do so again this year.  With so many natural disasters around the country and around the world, we decided to focus our donations this year on helping those affected.

Therefore, this coming Giving Tuesday, November 27, 2018, we will be donating 10% of our net sales to the Humane Society of Ventura County and the North Valley Animal Disaster Group to assist them as they help those affected by the horrible wildfires burning in California right now.

You can help by making any purchase on our website that day knowing that 10% of your purchase is going to those in need.  In addition, if you have rescued your pet you will still get 10% off your purchase price and we will still donate another 10% to the rescue of your choice.

So please help us make a difference this #GivingTuesday.  You can check out our complete product line to see what works best for you and the four-legged friend in your life. #HaleGives #HalePetDoorGives #GivingTuesday2018

Get Outside for National Walk Your Dog Week

47410078_l.jpgThe weather is starting to cool down, and this makes the first week in October the perfect time to celebrate National Walk Your Dog Week.

Obesity is on the rise in the US, both for humans and for their canine friends. In the US, an estimated 56% of dogs are overweight – that amounts to about 50 million dogs! Excess weight in dogs can create health problems such as diabetes, heart disease, pancreatitis and cancer. A sedentary lifestyle, which is a large contributing factor to obesity, can also cause behavior problems in dogs, due to boredom or excess energy that has not been burned off in a positive way. Sadly, these behavior problems can sometimes land dogs in overcrowded shelters. What can we do?

In addition to keeping a close eye on a dog’s diet, avoiding unhealthy foods and making sure not to overfeed, one great way to address a dog’s weight problem is to walk with them every day. A daily 30 minute walk will help both you and your dog meet national standards for heart health, and will get you both on the road to a healthier weight. The exercise also has the added benefit of tiring your dog out – remember, a tired dog is a good dog.

You may be thinking to yourself that you have a large yard, and a pet door for your dogs – isn’t this enough? While it is true that it is very beneficial for a dog to have free access to their yard, and it helps provide an excellent foundation for a healthy dog, there is more to the picture. When a dog is outside in their own yard, there is a lot of (valuable) time spent exploring his territory, sniffing around, lying in the sun – all very important activities for your dog. But this outside time doesn’t quite live up to the sustained exercise a dog needs – similar to how the time we spend outdoors in our garden, while great for us, doesn’t quite provide all of the cardiovascular exercise our own bodies need. Also, when you take your dog out into the world for a walk, there are new sights, sounds and smells that stimulate his brain in a different way than his usual scene, which gives him a mental health boost in addition to a heart health one.

You can even get your whole family involved. If you bring your kids along on your walks, you will be not only modeling an active lifestyle for them, but you will also be teaching them how to take excellent care of their own dogs when they get older.

These are all great points, but what if you don’t have a dog to walk? There is a great solution to that problem waiting for you at your local dog shelter. Remember how we mentioned above that some dogs end up in shelters due to behavior problems that have their root in a sedentary lifestyle and obesity? You can find yourself the perfect walking buddy in a dog who needs you to help him get to be his healthiest and happiest self. It’s a win-win!

Consider Adopting a Less Adoptable Pet

According to the ASPCA, 6.5 million companion animals enter shelters in the US every year. Shelter and rescue resources are stretched thin as they try to find homes for these pets, and sadly, only 50%, on average, will be adopted – and we know the sad end to the story for many of the other 50%.

In 2009, Petfinder.com, an online searchable database that partners with shelters and rescues to help connect homeless pets with adopters, founded “Adopt a Less Adoptable Pet Week” (the third week in September) to highlight the struggle of finding homes for pets who, statistically, have a harder time finding a home. In a recent survey, Petfinder revealed that 95% of responding rescues have pets that they define as being “hard to adopt.” While an average pet spends about 12 weeks on the site before adoption, pets that have special needs, black coats or senior pets may take four times that long to find a home.

While pets with health problems and disabilities, such as cats with FIV, or dogs with diabetes, can live relatively normal lives with average lifespans, the fact that they require a little extra care, and perhaps medication, makes a pet with special needs less likely to be adopted. Even disabilities as simple as a missing eye or leg, that requires no extra care, can cause a pet to be passed over. This tragic fact is made even more so when you consider how rewarding it can be to bring a pet like this into your family, and how manageable many disabilities and illnesses can become with a little education and support from a great veterinarian.

It may seem like an old wives’ tale, but many shelters and rescues still report that animals with a black coat are less likely to be adopted than pets of any other color. There are varying views on why this is true, from the lingering stigma of black cats (and even dogs) of old being associated with witchcraft and bad luck, to the belief that they are harder to photograph. Some sources state that it’s simply the fact that there are more black cats and dogs than other colors, and so people will pass them by in favor of a less common color. Whatever the reason, we hope our readers realize what great pets black cats and dogs make (I mean, black cats look like tiny panthers – what could be better?).

And when it comes to senior pets, this may be the saddest less-adoptable category of them all. Many times, senior pets have been given up because their older owners have died or had to move into assisted living, or their owners may have decided that they couldn’t deal with senior-related changes or expenses. These kinds of surrenders are so sad, because senior pets have likely been with their owners for many years, and don’t understand why they have been left in this situation. And, just as a side effect of not being a cute and cuddly little puppy or kitten any longer, these older pets may never find a new home. How sad, considering that senior pets can be the perfect pets – mellow, low demands for energy, they just need a loving place to lay their heads, and kind pat on the head, and a good meal.

When you next find yourself in the position of opening your home to a new pet, we hope that you keep these “less-adoptable” pets in mind. You could even consider covering all of the bases, and adopt a senior, special needs pet who happens to have a black coat – you could save a life and make a new best friend.

Celebrate National Craft for Your Local Shelter on July 21st

Local shelters and humane societies are always in need of financial or volunteer assistance and supplies. Crafters are always keeping busy with their favorite type of hobby. In 2012, Sew Doggy Style created National Craft for your Local Shelters Day on July 21st to combine the best of both worlds.

It is designed to be fun and affordable, simple and meaningful. No matter what type of crafting hobby you enjoy: sewing, knitting, crocheting, woodworking, etc. or even if you have no formal “crafting” skill, anyone can make something to donate to your local shelter.

Hale Pet Door is headquartered in Canon City, Colorado, and we interviewed Ann Goldman, owner of Yarned and Dangerous (our local knitting, crocheting, weaving, spinning, and fiber arts store) and Doug Rae, Executive Director of the Fremont County Humane Society to see one example of this special day in action.

Ann Goldman tells us: “What to do when you knit, love animals, and have spare time? You knit cat mats!

Here at our Local Yarn Shop, we get lots of donated yarn. We have many who love to knit but don’t need another hat, scarf, or afghan. So we pair those avid knitters with the donated yarn and the results? 100s of cat mats. We love knitting for our kitties housed at the Humane Society of Fremont County. We’ve been told they love our cat mats. These many cat mats have been turned into hammocks, nests, cocoons, or just nice blankies. It is our joy and pleasure. I found 2 pictures that show off the cats with the mats.

The little one with attitude is Felix. The older cat chilling is Aerosmith. They are available for adoption now. Of course, their mats go home with them.”

Executive Director Doug Rae adds: “The Humane Society of Fremont County relies on private donations on many levels. One such level is when local residents take it upon themselves to do something for the shelter animals. Ann and her gang from Yarned and Dangerous in Canon City regularly knit blankets for the shelter cats. Every cat in the shelter has one of those blankets in their kennel, and when the pet is adopted, the blanket goes home with the new adopter and the cat. One walk through cat adoptions and you’ll see how much the cats love these donated blankets.”

“Dick Ward has been making handmade animal puzzles out of wood for quite some time. A few years back, Dick and his wife Korla came to me with their offer to make puzzles for the shelter so we could sell them and turn the puzzles into cash for the animals. Dick’s puzzles are for sale for $10.00 each in our retail section.”

“Moreover, Dick has a similar set-up with Cup & Cone here in town. Dick provides Cup & Cone with his puzzles and almost every month, the shelter receives a check in the mail from the sales of Dick’s puzzles at Cup & Cone! I have offered to pay for the wood Dick uses for his puzzles, but he politely declines and will not take one penny from the shelter.”

“Deanna Jacobs donates her hand-made jewelry to the shelter. Deanna made this jewelry for a special event the shelter held. After every item sold at that event, Deanna gave the shelter enough of her to jewelry to fill up a large jewelry display in the lobby. All of Deanna’s items, whether it be bracelets or earrings, has something to do with the animals. Like everyone else, Deanna won’t take a penny from the shelter for her donated jewelry.”

What a wonderful testament to the giving spirit of these talented people.

If formal hobbies aren’t your style, you can make simple cat toys out of toilet paper tubes and kleenex boxes; you can make dog toys out of ropes or plastic water bottles; you can make beds and blankets out of old t-shirts and pillows. The ideas are endless.

For some more ideas and instructions on how you can participate in this holiday check out some of the following articles:

Your Craft Skills Can Help Shelter Cats

http://www.sewdoggystyle.com/p/craft-for-shelters.html

https://www.petguide.com/petcare/dog/6-easy-crafts-can-make-help-local-animal-shelter/

https://iheartdogs.com/10-ways-to-craft-for-your-local-shelter-on-july-21st/

https://www.vet-organics.com/blogs/news/national-craft-for-your-local-shelters-day

https://www.sitstay.com/blogs/good-dog-blog/help-your-local-shelter-with-these-fun-craft-projects

June is Adopt-A-Shelter Cat Month – My Stories

Every June is Adopt-a-Shelter Cat Month. It seems like every day is a “holiday” now and every month is some “special” month as well. It can get overwhelming. So instead of another article about how you should adopt a cat and save a life and how many cats get euthanized (between 860,000 and 1.4 million) every year, I thought I would share a more personal side to the story.

My family has had pets as long as I can remember. I vaguely remember when my dad brought home our first cat. Some neighbors of our friends had moved and left it locked in their house. Our friends rescued her and we ended up with “Snowball” a beautiful white longhair cat that was particularly fond of my dad. We had other cats come to us through the years through friends and acquaintances and a couple of rescues from the humane society. Our first dog was also “rescued” from friends who were moving back to Greece and were going to give the dog to the shelter. So we got “Sugar” a hugely overweight dachshund that didn’t know what dog food was. He had only eaten Greek people food his whole life. Needless to say, a diet and a lot of walks were in order.

But I have two special stories when they were “my” cats which “I” adopted from the humane society. They weren’t just family pets; we belonged to each other and we knew it. I feel like I was actually adopted by each one of them.

Dusty – “my” first cat

The first cat which was mine was “Dusty”. I don’t remember how old I was but I think it was in my early teens. Our humane society has two rows of cat cages and he was in the middle of the top row. I was going along playing with each cat, taking them out of their cages one at a time to see who I wanted to adopt. When I got to the cage next to his, he reached his paw out of his cage and tapped my arm wanting attention. When I got to him he was so full of love. I put him back and went on to the next cage and he again reached out of his cage and tapped my other arm. When I was going along the bottom row, he reached out with both paws and was tapping my head and playing with my hair. That was that. I knew I had been adopted. He came home with me that day.

Dusty and I had almost 20 happy years together (although I had to leave him with my parents for a few years when I moved to NYC) and he taught me a lot about responsibility and love. My favorite memory of Dusty is “chinnin’s”. He would rub his face and body back and forth against my chin purring the whole time. I was the only person he would do that with and I felt like he was saying “you’re mine!”.

My very first picture with Tica.  She was so tiny and already a snuggle bug.

Several years (and several family pets later) my husband and I adopted “Tica”. We had to put our previous cat to sleep (she was almost 25 years old) a couple of years earlier and we just hadn’t gotten another pet. My husband knew I was missing having one so unbeknownst to me he had gone to the humane society the day before and scouted out the cats ahead of time. The next day he took me with him so we could look together. There were several we were thinking about and he noticed this one in the big display window that hadn’t been out the day before. He said “what about this one?” but I immediately said no because she looked quite a bit like Dusty had and I wanted something different this time. A couple of other cats I didn’t pick because they were too young. (I always try to adopt cats that are a little bit older because kittens have a better chance at getting adopted. I like helping those who might be less fortunate.) We took a couple of cats into the get acquainted room but nothing clicked. Then we were going to take another one but it swatted and hissed at my husband so no go there. Finally there was only one other cat we were considering and the one in the window. I relented and we took them both into the get acquainted room. The other cat started roaming around, sniffing and exploring, but the cat in the window came right over to me. I sat down in the middle of the floor and she curled right up in my lap and started purring. When the other cat finally came around, she hissed and swatted at it to keep it away from me. That was it again. I had been adopted again.

The humane society said she was about two years old but she was so tiny. Our humane society has a deal with a local vet that all the animals who are adopted have to be spayed or neutered before you can take them home so you actually pick up your animal at the vet the next day. After work when I went to pick her up, the vet told me she was only about 9 months old. If I had known that the day before I would have been more hesitant to adopt her since I usually adopt older cats but we decided that was just another sign that it was meant to be.

So she had also picked me and she is the most unique cat I’ve ever know. My husband and I say that she got in the wrong line the day they were telling them they were cats because she acts like a dog a lot of times. She follows us around and greets us at the door. When my husband comes home from work, we have to go out on the front porch and wait for him. She does tricks for treats and she just loves being with her people. But she’s also all cat with her antics and humor and personality and we wouldn’t trade her for anything in the world. She can get her way with just about anything but she also fills our life with so much love and laughter and comfort. My husband calls her my “feline Zoloft”. We just think we own them. It is definitely the other way around.

I could fill pages and pages with stories about the cats in my life and the joys they have brought over the years. But hopefully these two adoption stories will encourage you to think about adding a new feline “bundle of joy” to your home during this special cat adoption month. Check out your local humane society or a cat rescue group to meet your newest family member.

Help Us Celebrate Adopt a Shelter Pet Day

12337829_lOn National Adopt a Shelter Pet Day (April 30, 2018), Hale Pet Door salutes the pet parents who have chosen to open their hearts and homes to pets in need through adoption.

With 6.5 million animals entering shelters every year across the US, overcrowding of shelters is one of the most pressing issues in animal welfare. Choosing to adopt a pet instead of buying one from a breeder or a pet store benefits both animals and people in a number of ways, including:

Saving Lives

When you adopt a shelter pet, you are not only saving the life of the pet you adopt, but you are making room for the pet that comes into the shelter after him. Your adoption fees also help support the shelter, which helps them save more pet lives.

Saving Money

It costs much less to adopt a pet through a shelter or a rescue when compared to purchasing, and your adopted pet will most likely be spayed or neutered, brought up to date on shots, dewormed, and treated for fleas and ticks before they come into your care, saving quite a lot of money on veterinary bills. Your shelter may also cover the cost of microchipping.

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You’ll Get a Great Pet

Most shelter pets end up there through no fault of their own – because of a divorce, or because their owners moved, or otherwise couldn’t take care of them any more. These pets are screened for behavioral or temperament concerns prior to adoption, and are ready to integrate into the right home. And adult pets are already potty trained! It’s also worth noting that there is a rescue out there for almost any kind of pet you are looking for, including exotic ones.

Improving Your Health

Owning a pet has been shown to improve your well being in a number of ways, including benefits to cardiovascular health, increased exercise, reduced stress, decreased loneliness, anxiety and depression, and strengthening of compassion and overall improvement of mood. Pets can even help improve your social life!

These are just a few of the many, many reasons why it’s so great to adopt a pet, but here’s one more:

Rescue Rewards

Hale Pet Door is proud of the continuing success of our Pet Rescue Rewards Program. When our customers adopt a pet, they save 10% off of their purchase of a Hale Pet Door product, and we donate an additional 10% to their rescue or shelter. To date, we have made thousands of donations to rescues and shelters across the country.

This April 30th, and every day, we THANK YOU for adopting your pet, and for helping us to give back to pets in need.

Lucky Animals Get Adopted

March is traditionally a month when people think about being “lucky”. We thought it would be a perfect time to reflect on the thousands of “lucky” pets who are adopted into loving homes every day around the country. And especially we wanted to emphasize the benefits of adopting over buying.

According to the ASPCA website in March 2017, there have been “dramatic decreases in shelter intake and euthanasia of homeless dogs and cats. The ASPCA reports that an estimated 1.5 million companion animals are euthanized in U.S. animal shelters nationwide every year, a decrease from about 2.6 million estimated in 2011. Contributing to this reduction is an 18.5 percent increase in national adoptions. An estimated 3.2 million shelter animals are adopted each year (1.6 million dogs and 1.6 million cats), up from 2.7 million adoptions in 2011.” This is wonderful progress but still a sad ending for the 1.5 million sweet and loving animals who continue to be euthanized every year.

How can you help?

  • Adopt don’t buy – Every pet bought at a pet store is one less adopted from a shelter and many pet store animals have come from puppy mills or disreputable breeders who do not provide humane conditions for their breeding animals.
  • Spay or Neuter your pets – Don’t add even more animals to the problem. Controlling the pet population at the source is a huge first step.
  • Volunteer – Check with your local humane society or a pet rescue. Animals need walked, fed, socialized, trained, kennels cleaned and more.
  • If you can’t adopt, FOSTER – Maybe you can welcome animals into your home temporarily until they find their forever home.

There are thousands of wonderful “lucky” stories of pets, rescued from bad situations or lengthy stays at shelters/rescues to loving homes. Dogs that have transformed themselves bringing joy and happiness to their new owners – some even becoming service animals for their new owners.

Here are just a few stories from around the internet that show the best of side of humans and our furry counterparts.

11 Tear-Jerking Stories of Rescue Dogs That Found the Homes They Deserve

Journey Into Rescue – The Story of a Lucky Puppy

10 Large Cat Breeds: The Next Best Thing to Owning a Tiger

Miracle Dogs: Rescue Stories

13 Before and After Adoption Stories of Dogs Will Make Your Heart Kablooey With Happy

5 Dog Adoption Stories That’ll Restore Your Faith in Humanity

5 of the Sweetest Pet Adoption Stories of 2016

To help your new/current dog have the best of both worlds (inside and outside) consider a Hale Pet Door to give them and you more freedom in your lives. And with Hale’s Rescue Rewards program, you not only help the pet you adopted you help other animals as well. When you purchase a pet door for your adopted pet and tell us the name of the rescue or humane society where you adopted them, you get 10% off your purchase and we donate an additional 10% back to the rescue so they can continue helping even more animals. A LUCKY day all around!

Hale Pet Door to Participate in Colorado Gives Day 2017 #ColoradoGives #HaleGives

Join Hale Pet Door December 5th for Colorado Gives Day. Hale Pet Door will donate 10% of our net sales to the Denver Dumb Friends League through Colorado Gives. #HaleGives

Hale Pet Door is proud to be a family owned small business based in Colorado. We love making a product that improves the lives of people and their pets. And we absolutely love that we can give back to those organizations who help save the lives of so many homeless pets through our Rescue Rewards program. Therefore, we are always looking for new opportunities to increase our charitable giving to help animals.

A few of our recent donations include:

Pet Rescues in Disaster Areas during the month of October

Military Pet Rescues during Veteran’s Day weekend

The Humane Society of the United States for #GivingTuesday

So our newest campaign to raise money for charity is for Colorado Gives Day which is December 5, 2017. We will be donating 10% of our net sales for the day to the Denver Dumb Friends League. So please help us raise more money for them by purchasing your Hale Pet Door product on December 5. Together we can make a difference.

For more information about the Colorado Gives and the Denver Dumb Friends League we have included excerpts from their websites below:

Colorado Gives Day

Join one of the largest one-day giving movements in the country.

Each December Coloradans come together with the common goal to strengthen the community by helping to power nonprofits. Community First Foundation and FirstBank partner to make this day rewarding for givers, nonprofits and the community as a whole.

This year Colorado Gives Day is Tuesday, December 5, and features a $1 million Incentive Fund. Every nonprofit receiving a donation on Colorado Gives Day will receive a portion of the fund, increasing the value of every dollar donated. Colorado Gives Day has grown to be the state’s largest one-day online giving event, raising more than $145 million since it began in 2010. #ColoradoGivesDay

The Denver Dumb Friends League is a national model for saving the lives of homeless pets. Each day, an average of 60 pets come to us in search of warmth, comfort, loving care, food and a second chance. Your support helped us save 19,413 pets this last fiscal year. #DumbFriendsLeague

#GivingTuesday is coming – Help Us With #HalePetDoorGives

We had a nice response to our Veteran’s Day weekend charity promotion and donated 5% of our net sales to Paws & Stripes and America’s VetDogs – Veteran’s K-9 Corps. Thank you all for participating with #HaleGives.

This has inspired us to do more, so on Giving Tuesday, 11/28/2017, Hale Pet Door will donate 10% of our net sales to the Humane Society of the United States. #HaleGives #HalePetDoorGives

The HSUS is leading the way for a better future for all animals around the world. They directly care for thousands of pets and wildlife each year through rescue efforts, disaster response, mobile veterinary clinics, five animal care centers and a global street dog program. The HSUS also provides training and services to local shelters and rescue groups, supports spay/neuter and adoption initiatives and offers tips on caring for your pets. The HSUS is an advocate for animals through public policy, corporate reforms and major campaigns to confront national and global cruelties. Here is a link to explore how they work: http://www.humanesociety.org/work #HumaneSociety #HSUS

Giving Tuesday was started in 2012 and is a global day of giving. Celebrated the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, it kicks off the holiday season by giving back – to your community, to charities – by volunteering, gifting or donating money. Created to combat commercialism and powered by social media and your collaboration.

Why is Giving Tuesday important:

  • Allows you to feel better about yourself
  • We help those in need
  • Everyone can participate

Ways to share on Giving Tuesday:

  • Give to your favorite charity or a new one
  • Volunteer at a local shelter or hospital
  • Donate items: blankets, clothes, coats, etc.
  • Use the hashtag #GivingTuesday to help raise awareness of the occasion among your social networks

More about Giving Tuesday:

Created by the team at the Belfer Center for Innovation & Social Impact — a cultural center in New York City that, since 1874, has been bringing people together around the values of service and giving back—Giving Tuesday connects diverse groups of individuals, communities and organizations around the world for one common purpose: to celebrate and encourage giving. A team of influencers and founding partners joined forces, collaborating across sectors, offering expertise and working tirelessly, to launch Giving Tuesday and have continued to shape, grow and strengthen the movement. Giving Tuesday has become a movement that celebrates and supports giving and philanthropy with events throughout the year and a growing catalog of resources. https://www.givingtuesday.org/about