November is Adopt a Senior Pet Month

Why You Should Consider Adopting a Senior Pet

When people think about adopting a new pet for their family, kittens and puppies often come to mind, not seniors. Older dogs and cats often take the longest to be adopted and are more likely to face being euthanized than younger adoptable pets. But that’s not because they’re not a great choice for adoption – but perhaps simply because they lack the “newness” of a puppy or kitten.

People also sometimes feel unsure about adopting an older canine or feline because of their shorter lifespan, or the possibilities of them needing extra veterinary care that will add more expense. Sometimes people assume that older pets were put up for adoption because there was something wrong with them or they might have a bad temperament, but that simply isn’t true in most cases. Older dogs and cats are often put up for adoption due to changes in financial or home situations. This regularly happens when seniors have to move into a retirement home or pass away, and their beloved pets are left without an owner and must be placed in a shelter.

The truth is, older pets can make a delightful addition to any family! In fact, there are many benefits to adopting a senior dog or cat over a younger one:

What You See is What You Get

Older pets often have calmer dispositions and their personalities are already formed. You’ll know if you’re adopting a dog that loves to lay on the couch and snuggle, or if they’re more of the loner type. You’ll also know if they’re good with kids and other pets, or if they prefer to be a solo fur baby. You’ll be able to find the perfect family member to fit into your home and lifestyle situation.

You Get to Skip the “Puppy” Phase

If you’ve ever owned a puppy or a kitten, you know just how daunting it can be for the first few months or even the first couple of years. Senior dogs tend to be more relaxed and less energetic than puppies, and an older cat will often be more socialized and less temperamental than kittens. Another great bonus is that the pet will most likely already be house or litter trained. Older dogs can also still be taught new tricks and will most likely come along with some training already!

Help a Senior Pet Find Their Forever Home Today

Senior pets face a much harder journey to get adopted than younger one. In many shelters and rescues, the senior pets are the most difficult ones to get adopted and take the longest. Many unfortunately never find their forever home and end up living out their days at a shelter. But you can be that loving home they’ve been waiting for. Senior canines and felines are hoping for just one thing; loving companionship. So, when you’re ready to open your home and welcome a new family member, we urge you to consider adopting a senior pet. We think they will make a wonderful addition to your family, and you’ll make their whole life wonderful.

Get an Energy Efficient Pet Door for Your New Senior Pet

Mature dogs often make the best pets

Mature dogs often make the best pets

November is Adopt-A-Senior Pet Month. It’s a great time to find your new best friend and save a life. Many shelters and rescues run “specials” on adoption fees for senior pets during November, so you’ll have more to spend on beds, toys, treats and a pet door.

In the world of pets, “senior” is not really “old”.  Very large dogs (over 90 pounds) are considered senior at age 6. Large dogs (51 – 90 pounds) become senior citizens at age 7. Medium dogs (21 – 50 pounds) are senior at age 8, and small dogs (up to 20 pounds) reach senior status at 9 years. Cats are considered senior citizens when they reach 9 years.

While puppies and kittens are cute, senior pets are a lot less work because they assimilate quickly, are not as destructive – no teething to deal with, are more laid back and really appreciate the care you give them.

As with pets of all ages, they require good food, fresh water and appropriate exercise. Most of all they flourish on love and attention.

When dogs can answer ‘nature’s call’ right away, they are healthier and less prone to develop urinary or digestive tract problems. Since it’s difficult for you to be home all the time, a high quality pet door can let the dog out and let him back in the house to rest.

No matter what size senior pet you adopt, you can have a dog door that’s the right size for your pet because Hale Pet Door makes 11 sizes of pet doors. If you want to replace your existing dog door with an energy efficient and durable Hale Pet Door, you can have a pet door made to fit the hole you already have in your door or wall. Just call 800-646-4773 with your rough opening – you might be surprised at how affordable a custom size dog door can be.

Because you want to keep the new addition to your family safe for years to come, the soft heavy vinyl flaps of the Hale Pet Door provide the best protection against outside air while staying safe for your pets. These flaps are crystal clear with stainless steel strikes that hold firm to 5 times stronger Alnico magnets while allowing your pet to come and go as he pleases.

Help the shelters and rescues find forever homes for their senior pets and save a life. Just let us know that you rescued your pet, and you’ll save 10% on your Hale Pet Door with our Rescue Rewards Program. We’ll donate that same 10% to the shelter or rescue where you adopted your pet.

Do you have a senior pet? What’s the best thing about your older pet? Please share in the comments below.

Hale Pet Door Rescue Rewards Partner in Chicagoland

Young at Heart Pet Rescue

The mission of Young at Heart Pet Rescue is to help senior cats and dogs, one grey muzzle at a time.

In April of 2005 Young At Heart Pet Rescue was formed to aid in the rescue and rehoming of older dogs and cats (age 5 and older) in the Chicagoland area. All of the pets come from open-admission shelters with high euthanasia rates for older animals. The group’s mission is to find a new home for every adoptable animal that comes through their door, to educate the public on the benefits of adopting older pets, and to decrease the euthanasia rate for older dogs and cats in Illinois.  The pets are adopted throughout the Midwest.

Each dog or cat receives veterinary care.   Animals that need a little extra medical attention are not turned away. All of the pets are vaccinated, tested for infectious diseases, microchipped, spayed/neutered, receive a geriatric screening, and most receive a dental.

Lexi, a cat waiting for adoption at Young at Heart Pet Rescue

Lexi, a cat waiting for adoption at Young at Heart Pet Rescue

“We also provide other treatments to enhance any senior pet’s adoptability.  We have lumps removed, even if they are benign. We treat allergies, heartworm, thyroid ailments, provide prescription food. We do whatever it takes to help senior pets find their forever homes,” the group’s website explains. “And when their medical needs prove to be too daunting to our adoption program, they are not euthanized at Young at Heart. They find their happily ever after in one of our licensed Sanctuary Homes, where they are loved and cared for like one of the family while we provide all their medical care.”

Young at Heart  is a non-profit 501c3 volunteer-based organization that operates with a small army of dedicated volunteers. Dogs are housed in licensed foster homes, and cats reside in a cageless adoption area donated by Best Friends Pet Care or an adoption center within Petco in Lake Zurich, Ill.

Sunny is waiting for adoption from Young At Heart Pet Rescue

Sunny is waiting for adoption from Young At Heart Pet Rescue

As their website explains: “We stay small enough so that each dog or cat in our care gets ample one-on-one time, playtime, lap time, and the basic human contact that many animals just cannot receive in larger organizations. It is very important to us that the dogs and cats in our care feel loved, are happy, and are well-adjusted when they go to their forever homes.”

Go to their website at www.yahpetrescue.com to see the dogs and cats needing homes, plus to read more.