Important Things You Need to Know Before Leaving Your Dog in a Hot Car

It can be tempting for all of us to leave our dog in the car from time to time. You’re simply trying to make a couple quick errands and need to run into the grocery store to grab a few things. Ten minutes tops. Or maybe trying to mail a package. Perhaps you just finished up an epic game of catch at the dog park, and now your pooch is riding shotgun. With just a couple small errands to do on the way home, you hate the thought of having to drop your dog off at home before making them. And although it can feel like a hassle to do just that, a beautiful, warm day could easily turn deadly for a dog locked in a car.

Hundreds of dogs die each year from being left in a hot car. Unfortunately, some owners with very good intentions simply do not understand how dangerous it can be to leave your dog in a car. Our hope is that if more people spread the word about the dangers of leaving dogs in cars, it will help educate owners and save a dog’s life. Here are some important things you need to know before leaving your dog in a hot car.

Did you know that cracking the windows does not help keep your dog cool? According to a study by San Francisco University, cracking windows had very little effect on the rising temperature inside the car. On a 70 degree day, the temperature inside the car can rise to 99 degrees within 20 minutes. On a 90 degree day, that temperature can reach almost 120 degrees in that same time. Scary, huh?

Although all dog breeds are susceptible to heat stroke, or hyperthermia, it’s important to note that some breeds are even more sensitive due to the shape of their skull. Breeds like Pugs, Boston Terriers, and Bulldogs could suffer from heat stroke even faster than other breeds. When dogs are hot, they pant to help regulate their body temperature. But once panting becomes ineffective against the heat and their body temperature rises too drastically, heat stroke will occur. Once heat stroke has begun to set in, the dog’s health will quickly deteriorate and it can happen extremely fast. Unfortunately, if a dog’s body heat rises too much, permanent organ damage and death can happen. According to an article by Earnest Ward, DVM with the VCA Animal Hospital,The prognosis depends on how high the body temperature elevated, how long the hyperthermia persisted and what the physical condition of the pet was prior to the heat stroke.”

Some obvious signs of heat stroke include excessive drooling, feeling warm to the touch, and a dry nose. If your dog is showing signs of heat stroke, it’s important to get him moved to a cooler environment immediately. An air conditioned room is ideal. You can apply room temperature water to his body, but do not use ice as this will lower his body temperature too quickly. Finally, make sure to get him to a veterinarian as soon as possible. When it comes to hyperthermia, time is of the essence.

So, remember during these warm summer months, it may be convenient at times to let your pooch tag along on your errands, but don’t be tempted. It’s not worth risking your dog’s health to save a little time. Keep your dog happy and healthy by leaving him home when you have stops to make.

 

 

 

 

Water Safety Tips for Dogs

Summer is finally here and you and your pup are ready to hit the water together for some quality fun in the sun time! But before you and Fido dive in – there’s a few things you need to know to keep your pup safe this summer.

shutterstock_193662557Don’t forget the sunscreen!

This may surprise you, but dogs are vulnerable to getting sunburns, too! Especially those with lighter colored coats. There are even some amazing sunblock brands out there that are made specifically for dogs! So remember to throw a bottle in your bag before you head out the door.

Are you sure your dog can swim?

Before you even venture out into the water, it’s pretty important to know whether or not your dog can even swim. Some breeds flourish in the water. Other breeds not only don’t enjoy being in the water, but really struggle to swim well at all. So before you take your pooch for dip, let him explore some shallow areas first to see if it’s something he’ll enjoy or not.

Invest in a life vest

Whether your dog is a seasoned swimmer or a little nervous to even be near the water, a life vest is a smart item to purchase. No matter if you’re taking your dog out on a boat, or going to play fetch in the nearby river, a vest can be a valuable safety tool to keep your four legged swimmer safe no matter what happens. Just make sure that you measure him and pick out a vest that will fit him appropriately.

shutterstock_533592607Don’t forget that dog’s are not allowed everywhere

As much as we adore our little fur babys, they’re not always allowed everywhere we go. Some places are just not safe places for dogs to play. So be sure to check before you head out with your dog.

shutterstock_594205211Be on the lookout for blue-green algae

You may have heard about it on the news. There is a bacteria known as cyanobacteria that’s usually found in still waters like ponds and lakes. Although it’s not always easy to spot, you can often see it as a blue or green film sitting on the water. Sometimes it will look like brown or green flakes sitting on the shore. Unfortunately this bacteria is often fatal to dogs, so if you see anything unusual in the water, keep your dog away.

Bring fresh water for your pooch to drink

Although your pooch may be tempted to drink from the water he’s playing in, it’s not always a good idea. If it’s fresh water, it’s probably fine, but it wouldn’t be a bad idea to bring some bottles of water along for the trip just in case you encounter some water that looks a little less than safe. And if you’ll be hanging out around the ocean, you’ll most definitely want to bring water as drinking ocean water can make your dog very sick. Don’t forget the collapsable bowls!

Don’t forget to rinse!

After your dog is all finished playing in the water, don’t forget to give him a good rinse to get any bacteria, chlorine, or debris out of his coat. If he decides to groom himself, you don’t want him to ingest anything harmful off his skin and coat. Giving your dog a wash will also help keep his skin from feeling irritated from the water, sand, and debris he may have encountered. And don’t forget to clean his ears – especially those breeds with floppy ears!

Have fun this summer and be safe!

Keep Your Pets Cool During the Hot Summer Weather

Black Schnauzer running in grass

Dogs enjoy summer, but it’s up to us to keep them safe

As you’re having fun in the sun, be sure to keep in mind your dog’s health and welfare. Dogs, just like people, can suffer from too much sun and heat.

Here are some of the dangers that summer heat can create and steps you can take to prevent them.

  • NEVER leave your dog in a parked car. Even with the windows cracked open, temperatures can rise quickly causing your beloved pet to suffer heatstroke or even death. What you think may be a quick errand can turn into a 20 minute delay that could endanger your best friend’s life. On a 95 degree day, your car can turn into a 130 degree oven in only 30 minutes. Don’t take a chance – leave your pet home while you run to the store.
  • Hot pavement can burn paws. If it’s too hot for you to walk barefoot on the sidewalk, street or parking lot, your pet’s paws can be burned on those surfaces as well.
  • Because dogs and cats don’t sweat but pant to regulate body temperature, keep in mind that breathing hot air will slow the cooling process. In extreme heat, keep your pets in the same temperatures where you are comfortable – whether that’s outside in the shade or indoors in a temperature controlled environment.
  • Remember that your pet’s coat protects her from the sun. Don’t shave your pet thinking she’ll be cooler. She may be susceptible to sunburn without her fur coat protection, and her coat helps regulate her temperature.
  • If your dog has a thin light colored coat, consider using a pet approved sunscreen on the bridge of his nose and ear tips when you’re going to be out in the sun for an extended period.
  • Provide plenty of cool clean water all of the time as hydration is crucial to keeping your pet’s temperature normal.
  • Exercise and walks are important to your dog’s physical and emotional health, so walk early in the morning before the heat of the day or in the evening when the temperatures have cooled down.
  • Get an energy efficient Hale Pet Door, so your pets can access the outdoors to relieve themselves and return to the cool indoor environment.

Fourth of July Safety Tips for Your Pets

Keep your pets safe while celebrating

Sensitive dogs like this one require extra care during the noisy celebrations of Independence Day

The busiest day at Shelters around the country is the Fifth of July. So many pets get so scared by the explosions and lights that they run blindly in terror and can’t find their way home and end up at the local pound.

Here are some tips to keep your pets safe and calm while the country celebrates her birthday:

  • Find a Quiet Place – Keep your pets confined to a safe room in your home while the fireworks are on. Play some comforting music or turn on the television to block the noise. If you’re not going out to celebrate, relax and pet or cuddle with your cat or dog making them comfortable.
  • If it’s barbeque or block party time, be sure to keep your pet safe inside your home, so she doesn’t hear your voice and try to jump the fence to get to you or those enticing food odors.
  • Keep those delicious party foods for people. Exotic foods coupled with excitement can upset your pet’s digestive system. Remember that tasty foods that we enjoy, like: avocado, onion, raisins, grapes, chocolate and alcohol can be toxic to our furry friends.
  • Although sunscreen and bug repellant may help you enjoy the outdoors, don’t use these products on your pet unless they are specifically made for animals’ delicate skin.
  • Even if your pet is not afraid of the booms and bright lights of fireworks, be sure to keep him away from matches and sparklers as they can cause burns.
  • Be sure to securely fasten your Hale Pet Door security cover to keep your pets safe inside the house while you go out to celebrate.

Keep summer a fun time by keeping your pets safe while you celebrate Independence Day!