National Poison Prevention Week

March 18-24, 2018 is National Poison Prevention Week

50174473 - chart of toxic foods for dogs. also available without text.

Remember your furry friends this week and always. There are a lot of different things (plants, medicines, people food, household products, etc) that can make your animals sick or even kill them.


  • Be prepared for an emergency. Keep the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center number at your fingertips by saving the number in your mobile phone: 888-426-4435
  • Practice safe storage habits for household chemicals and other substances that can be poisonous for pets
  • Read and follow all labels and directions
  • Detect invisible threats

36871833 - white cat fight green snake in untidy dirty garden, danger.The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center is the best resource for any animal poison-related emergency. They are available at 888-426-4435, 24 hours/365 days a year and staffed by veterinary health professionals. There may be a fee for the call.

The ASPCA has a good page with more information on specific items:

If you have a pet door, please be aware of what’s in your yard, for their safety and health.


Celebrate K-9 Veterans Day on March 13th

63544343_lDogs were called to duty in 1942, as the US Army was expanding quickly due to WWII. The United States K9 Corps was established March 13, 1942. Mrs. Alene Erlanger, a private citizen, initiated a program called Dogs for Defense. She, along with some breeders and the AKC, started a group to train dogs for military use. They had the first dogs ready for service by November, 1942.

The dogs are trained in bomb, drug and weapon detection, tracking the enemy and defending their unit. These dogs’ loyalty, bravery and high level of training make them extremely valuable to any unit that they are attached to.8887524 - airport canine. dog sniffs out drugs or bomb in a luggage.

There are approximately 2,500 dogs in active service today, with about 700 deployed overseas.

Joseph White, a retired military working dog trainer, originated the idea for this special day – March 13th – National K9 Veterans Day.

We salute and thank all of the K-9 military and service dogs!

Lucky Animals Get Adopted

March is traditionally a month when people think about being “lucky”. We thought it would be a perfect time to reflect on the thousands of “lucky” pets who are adopted into loving homes every day around the country. And especially we wanted to emphasize the benefits of adopting over buying.

According to the ASPCA website in March 2017, there have been “dramatic decreases in shelter intake and euthanasia of homeless dogs and cats. The ASPCA reports that an estimated 1.5 million companion animals are euthanized in U.S. animal shelters nationwide every year, a decrease from about 2.6 million estimated in 2011. Contributing to this reduction is an 18.5 percent increase in national adoptions. An estimated 3.2 million shelter animals are adopted each year (1.6 million dogs and 1.6 million cats), up from 2.7 million adoptions in 2011.” This is wonderful progress but still a sad ending for the 1.5 million sweet and loving animals who continue to be euthanized every year.

How can you help?

  • Adopt don’t buy – Every pet bought at a pet store is one less adopted from a shelter and many pet store animals have come from puppy mills or disreputable breeders who do not provide humane conditions for their breeding animals.
  • Spay or Neuter your pets – Don’t add even more animals to the problem. Controlling the pet population at the source is a huge first step.
  • Volunteer – Check with your local humane society or a pet rescue. Animals need walked, fed, socialized, trained, kennels cleaned and more.
  • If you can’t adopt, FOSTER – Maybe you can welcome animals into your home temporarily until they find their forever home.

There are thousands of wonderful “lucky” stories of pets, rescued from bad situations or lengthy stays at shelters/rescues to loving homes. Dogs that have transformed themselves bringing joy and happiness to their new owners – some even becoming service animals for their new owners.

Here are just a few stories from around the internet that show the best of side of humans and our furry counterparts.

11 Tear-Jerking Stories of Rescue Dogs That Found the Homes They Deserve

Journey Into Rescue – The Story of a Lucky Puppy

10 Large Cat Breeds: The Next Best Thing to Owning a Tiger

Miracle Dogs: Rescue Stories

13 Before and After Adoption Stories of Dogs Will Make Your Heart Kablooey With Happy

5 Dog Adoption Stories That’ll Restore Your Faith in Humanity

5 of the Sweetest Pet Adoption Stories of 2016

To help your new/current dog have the best of both worlds (inside and outside) consider a Hale Pet Door to give them and you more freedom in your lives. And with Hale’s Rescue Rewards program, you not only help the pet you adopted you help other animals as well. When you purchase a pet door for your adopted pet and tell us the name of the rescue or humane society where you adopted them, you get 10% off your purchase and we donate an additional 10% back to the rescue so they can continue helping even more animals. A LUCKY day all around!

World Spay Day

Spread the message that spaying and neutering saves lives!

World Spay Day is an international day of action to promote the sterilization of pets, community cats and street dogs as a way to save animals’ lives. It takes place each year on the last Tuesday of February.

Created as Spay Day USA by the Doris Day Animal League (DDAL) in 1995, World Spay Day is now a program of The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), Humane Society International (HSI) and Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association (HSVMA).

In 1995, the estimated euthanasia rate in overcrowded shelters was between 14 and 17 million dogs and cats each year. While there is still much work to be done, we’re happy to report that currently the estimated number of dogs and cats euthanized in U.S. shelters has dropped to 2.7 million annually.

In every community, in every state, there are homeless animals. In the U.S., there are an estimated 6-8 million homeless animals entering animal shelters every year. Barely half of these animals are adopted. Tragically, the rest are euthanized. These are healthy, sweet pets who would have made great companions.

A USA Today (May 7, 2013) article cites that pets who live in the states with the highest rates of spaying/neutering also live the longest. According to the report, neutered male dogs live 18% longer than unneutered male dogs and spayed female dogs live 23% longer than unspayed female dogs.

Spaying and Neutering curbs bad behavior:

  • Unneutered dogs are much more assertive and prone to urine-marking (lifting their leg) than neutered dogs. Although it is most often associated with male dogs, females may do it, too. Spaying or neutering your dog should reduce urine-marking and may stop it altogether.
  • For cats, the urge to spray is extremely strong in an intact cat, and the simplest solution is to get yours neutered or spayed by 4 months of age before there’s even a problem. Neutering solves 90 percent of all marking issues, even in cats that have been doing it for a while. It can also minimize howling, the urge to roam, and fighting with other males.
  • Roaming, especially when females are “in heat.”
  • Aggression: Studies also show that most dog bites involve dogs who are unaltered.
  • Excessive barking, mounting, and other dominance-related behaviors.

While getting your pets spayed/neutered can help curb undesirable behaviors, it will not change their fundamental personality, like their protective instinct.

Here are some ideas on how to help:

  • Share infographics on social media. Use #WorldSpayDay for promoting an event.
  • Set up a table at a popular location and distribute literature on the importance of spaying and neutering to control pet and street animal populations.
  • Organize a visit to a school or a youth or community group to speak about what pets need to be healthy and happy.
  • Write a letter to the editor of your local newspaper advocating spaying and neutering to pet owners and government officials.
  • Raise money to subsidize the cost of spays and neuters performed during or after World Spay Day. Raffles, bake sales, benefit concerts and shelter open houses are just a few examples of fundraising events that some organizers have found to be successful.
  • As an individual, you can participate by sponsoring a pet’s spay/neuter surgery. Contact your local shelter to make a donation, or sponsor a spay/neuter surgery for a pet in need.

Focus on Your Feline During National Cat Health Month

February is National Cat Health Month, it’s also known as a month to celebrate love. One way to show your love is to schedule a visit to the vet for an annual check-up. The vet will check for periodontal disease, obesity and more. Be sure to write down any questions or concerns you have before you go.

Did you know . . .

  • Cats purr at a frequency of vibration that aids bone and tissue growth and repair.
  • Cats also produce a “silent” meow which is thought to be a request for attention or a show of genuine affection from cat to owner. It is pitched too high for the human ear to hear.
  • Most cats eyes glow silvery green when light is shone into them at night, but Siamese cats eyes glow red.
  • Cats eyes function in about 1/6th the light needed for human vision but cannot function in complete darkness.
  • Cats memory can last up to 16 hours in contrast to a dog’s memory that lasts about 5 minutes.
  • A cat can jump from a standing start to over 5 times its body height.
  • One female cat averages 6 kitten per year, 75% of which die before reproductive age.
  • One female cat and her offspring will produce 100 cats in 7 years.
  • 38% of US households own a cat.

Ways to keep your kitty content:

  • Rotate toys every few weeks to keep your cat’s interest and banish boredom.
  • Cats are huggable when they are asleep, but they do need 16 hours of sleep each playing with feather toy
  • Put the litter box in a quiet area of your home, give them privacy.
  • Do Not Declaw – it only solves a symptom. Buy a scratching post or kitty condo.
  • Cats know when they are being sung to and often meow, so serenade your sweetie.
  • Cats don’t like harsh noises, but they love the sound of soft whispers.
  • Buy fresh catnip to stuff it into an old sock.
  • Clean their potty often, cats hate dirty litter boxes.
  • Play TV shows or videos for cats or tune into a nature channel.
  • Get toys that involve both you and your pet.
  • Lavish your cat with attention.

Winter Pet Safety: Top 7 Tips

80346687 - shih tzu dog in blue knitted sweater winter outdoors portrait

1. Get an energy efficient Hale Pet Door

When it’s cold and snowy outside, you may be tempted to leave your dog indoors where you know he’ll be safe from the tempestuous winter weather when you’re away from home. But it’s important that your dog has access to the outdoors to answer nature’s call when necessary. Having to ‘hold it’ can cause urinary tract and digestive issues that can result in much discomfort for your dog and extensive veterinarian bills for you.

2. Don’t leave your pet in a parked car

Your parked car can be a freezer – trapping the cold air inside. It can be just as dangerous to leave your pet in your unattended car in the winter as in the hot months.

3. Give your pet a warm bed

Just as you like a warm comfortable place to sleep, so does your cat or dog. Provide a bed – off the floor if possible – in an area away from drafts. A blanket can help trap your pet’s body heat, so she gets a good night’s sleep for optimal health and wellness.

4. Keep common poisons out of pets’ reach

All medications, antifreeze (just a few licks can cause death), rodent baits and poisons, and some houseplants can make your pets sick. Use only pet-friendly ice melting products that won’t irritate your pets when they lick their paws and stomachs.

5. Prevent hypothermia and frostbite

Let your dog’s coat grow longer for the winter months. If your dog has a short coat, get him a coat or sweater that covers him from the base of his head to his tail and around his belly. If your pet gets too cold and shows signs of hypothermia: disoriented, shivering, lethargic or hair standing on end, get her to the vet immediately. Frostbite can affect the tips of the ears, extremities and reproductive organs turning the skin bright red, pale or black.

6. Avoid electrocution and fire hazards

Chewing on heating pads wires can cause electrocution or shock. Heating pads’ iron oxide pads can cause poisoning. Portable heaters can be both a shock and fire hazard, so don’t leave your pet unattended with one in the room.

7. Bang on the hood

Feral cats and wildlife seek the warmth of vehicle engines. Give them a chance to escape by knocking on the hood before starting your car or truck.

Keep yourself and your best friends safe this winter season.

Keep Your Pets Safe This Holiday Season

Keep Your Pets Safe This Holiday Season

Keeping your furry friends safe during the busy holiday season can be quite the challenge. There are new and interesting temptations in your home, new noises and smells, and likely a lot more people coming and going. In the hustle and bustle, it can sometimes be easy to overlook some common dangers for your pet. To help keep everyone in the holiday spirit – and out of the animal hospital – we have put together a little list of simple things you can do to keep your pets safe this holiday season.

Holiday Decorations: Tinsel can be very attractive to pets, particularly cats. While it may be fun to play with, ingesting it could result in an intestinal blockage. Similarly, if glass ornaments are broken and eaten, there would be great potential for serious damage to the digestive tract, or the glass shards could injure paws or other parts of the body. Lights that are hung too low on the tree are very tempting to pets who like to chew, and could create a fire or electrocution hazard. It is best to hang all holiday decorations out of reach of all household pets.

Holiday Plants: Mistletoe, holly and poinsettia are common holiday plants, and all of these are toxic to pets. It is best to avoid these plants in a household with pets, but if you have them, make sure they are out of your pet’s reach. Call your veterinarian or poison control center if you believe your pet has ingested any of these plants.

Christmas Tree: It can make your pet ill to eat certain types of Christmas trees, as well, so watch your pet closely for interest in chewing on the tree itself. The tree water can also be a concern, as it can contain fertilizers and/or bacteria, so it is a great idea to anchor your tree to the wall to prevent a spill, as well as to keep the tree from falling over onto your pet. Keep loose pine needles cleaned up off of the floor.

Gifts: Covered with bright colors, ribbons and bows, gifts can be an enormous temptation to curious pets. Make sure there are no food items inside the gifts under the tree, and it might help to minimize loose strings. Many people choose to place their tree in a corner and gate it off once presents starts to accumulate – this might be the safest choice to cover all of your bases.

Holiday Gatherings: Finally, one of the best parts of the holiday season is getting a chance to visit with loved ones, but sometimes the full house can be stressful for your pet. Take a few moments to make certain that your pet is fed on the same schedule as they are used to, and has a safe haven to escape the commotion, whether it is their favorite room, comfy bed, or through their Hale Pet Door into their cozy outdoor space.

Happy Holidays, from all of us at Hale Pet Door, to you and your furry family members!

Hale Pet Door to Participate in Colorado Gives Day 2017 #ColoradoGives #HaleGives

Join Hale Pet Door December 5th for Colorado Gives Day. Hale Pet Door will donate 10% of our net sales to the Denver Dumb Friends League through Colorado Gives. #HaleGives

Hale Pet Door is proud to be a family owned small business based in Colorado. We love making a product that improves the lives of people and their pets. And we absolutely love that we can give back to those organizations who help save the lives of so many homeless pets through our Rescue Rewards program. Therefore, we are always looking for new opportunities to increase our charitable giving to help animals.

A few of our recent donations include:

Pet Rescues in Disaster Areas during the month of October

Military Pet Rescues during Veteran’s Day weekend

The Humane Society of the United States for #GivingTuesday

So our newest campaign to raise money for charity is for Colorado Gives Day which is December 5, 2017. We will be donating 10% of our net sales for the day to the Denver Dumb Friends League. So please help us raise more money for them by purchasing your Hale Pet Door product on December 5. Together we can make a difference.

For more information about the Colorado Gives and the Denver Dumb Friends League we have included excerpts from their websites below:

Colorado Gives Day

Join one of the largest one-day giving movements in the country.

Each December Coloradans come together with the common goal to strengthen the community by helping to power nonprofits. Community First Foundation and FirstBank partner to make this day rewarding for givers, nonprofits and the community as a whole.

This year Colorado Gives Day is Tuesday, December 5, and features a $1 million Incentive Fund. Every nonprofit receiving a donation on Colorado Gives Day will receive a portion of the fund, increasing the value of every dollar donated. Colorado Gives Day has grown to be the state’s largest one-day online giving event, raising more than $145 million since it began in 2010. #ColoradoGivesDay

The Denver Dumb Friends League is a national model for saving the lives of homeless pets. Each day, an average of 60 pets come to us in search of warmth, comfort, loving care, food and a second chance. Your support helped us save 19,413 pets this last fiscal year. #DumbFriendsLeague

#GivingTuesday is coming – Help Us With #HalePetDoorGives

We had a nice response to our Veteran’s Day weekend charity promotion and donated 5% of our net sales to Paws & Stripes and America’s VetDogs – Veteran’s K-9 Corps. Thank you all for participating with #HaleGives.

This has inspired us to do more, so on Giving Tuesday, 11/28/2017, Hale Pet Door will donate 10% of our net sales to the Humane Society of the United States. #HaleGives #HalePetDoorGives

The HSUS is leading the way for a better future for all animals around the world. They directly care for thousands of pets and wildlife each year through rescue efforts, disaster response, mobile veterinary clinics, five animal care centers and a global street dog program. The HSUS also provides training and services to local shelters and rescue groups, supports spay/neuter and adoption initiatives and offers tips on caring for your pets. The HSUS is an advocate for animals through public policy, corporate reforms and major campaigns to confront national and global cruelties. Here is a link to explore how they work: #HumaneSociety #HSUS

Giving Tuesday was started in 2012 and is a global day of giving. Celebrated the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, it kicks off the holiday season by giving back – to your community, to charities – by volunteering, gifting or donating money. Created to combat commercialism and powered by social media and your collaboration.

Why is Giving Tuesday important:

  • Allows you to feel better about yourself
  • We help those in need
  • Everyone can participate

Ways to share on Giving Tuesday:

  • Give to your favorite charity or a new one
  • Volunteer at a local shelter or hospital
  • Donate items: blankets, clothes, coats, etc.
  • Use the hashtag #GivingTuesday to help raise awareness of the occasion among your social networks

More about Giving Tuesday:

Created by the team at the Belfer Center for Innovation & Social Impact — a cultural center in New York City that, since 1874, has been bringing people together around the values of service and giving back—Giving Tuesday connects diverse groups of individuals, communities and organizations around the world for one common purpose: to celebrate and encourage giving. A team of influencers and founding partners joined forces, collaborating across sectors, offering expertise and working tirelessly, to launch Giving Tuesday and have continued to shape, grow and strengthen the movement. Giving Tuesday has become a movement that celebrates and supports giving and philanthropy with events throughout the year and a growing catalog of resources.

November is Adopt a Senior Dog Month

13982957_lLet’s help the rescues and shelters to adopt all their senior dogs this month (and every month). Now we know those puppies are awfully cute and cuddly and so irresistible – but so are the senior dogs. There are many pluses to getting a senior dog. And many times a senior dog is a perfect match for a senior person.

  • Most senior dogs are already housetrained, saving you time and stress training a new puppy where to do his business. Puppies need lots of patience, energy and consistent training; so they become a well behaved dog.
  • Older dogs won’t need the constant monitoring that their younger counterparts need for house training, chewing or other mischief.
  • Older dogs are typically calmer and less energetic than puppies; they are easier to teach new tricks. In fact, many already know basic commands. Because they are calmer and have longer attention spans they learn new things easier and quicker.
  • Senior dog’s personalities are already developed and they are full grown. So you know from the start if the two of you will be a good match. For instance if they’re a snuggle-bunny, ready for naptime or one that likes hikes, car rides or walks in the great outdoors.
  • And the love and gratitude that they give you is unfathomable. They will be a loyal, grateful new member of your family.

Rescue groups and shelters are able to assess the dogs and match you with the best dog based on their personality and your lifestyle. Because they assess the dogs they can give you information about the dog’s health, training, grooming requirements, etc.

It’s sad that dogs, sometimes only as old as 5 years, are often the last and most difficult group to be adopted. Senior dogs tend to spend the longest amount of time in rescues or shelters before finding their “furever” home.

Many senior pets are at a rescue or shelter because their lives have been uprooted either due to a death or tragedy of their former owner. Most are exceptionally affectionate and attentive pets, wanting nothing more than to please their new owner – YOU.

Check with your local shelter or a rescue group to see if they have any specials on adopting a senior pet. And don’t forget as with any pet rescue, if you adopt a senior pet, Hale Pet Door will give you 10% off the price of your pet door and donate an additional 10% to the rescue or humane society where you adopted your pet.